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Marine Biology

, Volume 143, Issue 1, pp 23–38 | Cite as

Molecular phylogeny of Ostracoda (Crustacea) inferred from 18S ribosomal DNA sequences: implication for its origin and diversification

  • S. Yamaguchi
  • K. Endo
Article

Abstract

Nucleotide sequences for the 18S rDNA of 17 ostracod species, representing 4 extant orders and 12 superfamilies, were determined and compared with known sequences of other crustaceans. Resulting molecular phylogenetic trees based on maximum-likelihood, maximum-parsimony, and neighbor-joining methods consistently indicated that the Podocopida plus Platycopida forms a monophyletic group, but did not indicate monophyly of the Ostracoda consisting of the four orders, Podocopida, Platycopida, Kirkbyocopida, and Myodocopida. The tree topology and the crustacean fossil record suggest that the lineage of podocopidans and platycopidans, that of kirkbyocopidans, and that of myodocopidans should have separately been established already in the Cambrian, although there is no ostracod fossil record in that time period. Close relationships between the Bythocytheroidea and Cytheroidea and among the Macrocypridoidea, Pontocypridoidea, and Cypridoidea can safely be postulated, but other relationships among podocopidan and platycopidan superfamilies could not be resolved from the 18S rDNA data. The polychotomous relationship among five lineages of the podocopidan and platycopidan superfamilies, i.e. Cytherelloidea, Bairdioidea, Darwinuloidea, Bythocytheroidea plus Cytheroidea, and Macrocypridoidea plus Pontocypridoidea plus Cypridoidea, suggests that common ancestors of those lineages diverged from each other rapidly in short intervals in the early Paleozoic.

Keywords

Cambrian Ordovician Lower Cambrian Rapid Radiation Synapomorphic Character 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are indebted to K. Tanabe for constructive criticism of the manuscript. We thank D.J. Horne and T. Kamiya for their help in sample collection in England. Thanks are extended to S. Ohta, Y. Shirayama, the captain, crew, and colleagues for their support during the R.V. "Tansei" cruises. We are grateful to A. Tsukagoshi, R. Ueshima, T. Oji, N. Ikeya, and T. Hanai, who provided us with many valuable suggestions. This research was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (no. 10-5089) of the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Government of Japan. The experiments carried out in this study comply with the current laws of Japan.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Earth and Planetary SciencesUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Marine Ecosystems Dynamics, Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Institute of GeoscienceUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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