Wood Science and Technology

, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 557–569 | Cite as

Location and fate of carboxyl groups in aspen alkaline peroxide-impregnated chemithermomechanical pulp fibres during alkaline peroxide bleaching

  • Yingjuan Fu
  • Menghua Qin
  • Yanzhu Guo
  • Qinghua Xu
  • Zongquan Li
  • Na Liu
  • Zaiwu Yuan
  • Yang Gao
Original
  • 260 Downloads

Abstract

The origin and kinetic changes of carboxyl groups in aspen chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP) fibres during alkaline peroxide bleaching were evaluated. The results showed that the major contributors of carboxyl groups in aspen CTMP fibres were the 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, galacturonic acid and the carboxyl groups in oxidized lignin. Alkaline peroxide bleaching could increase the total carboxyl groups, surface charge and dissolved anionic substances. However, the excess degradation by superfluous hydroxide and peroxide could result in the reduction of carboxyl groups in fibres because of the production and dissolution of low-molar-mass substances. The total carboxyl groups from polysaccharides in fibres remained constant, and the increase of carboxyl groups in fibres should result from the carboxyl groups newly formed by the lignin oxidation during peroxide bleaching. Alkaline peroxide bleaching could also result in the removal of a large part of extractives and a small fraction of lignin on the fibre surface.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET-08-0882), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30972327), and the Science and Technology Development Program of Shandong Province (2011GGX10802).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yingjuan Fu
    • 1
  • Menghua Qin
    • 1
  • Yanzhu Guo
    • 1
  • Qinghua Xu
    • 1
  • Zongquan Li
    • 1
  • Na Liu
    • 1
  • Zaiwu Yuan
    • 1
  • Yang Gao
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and TechnologyJinanChina

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