Wood Science and Technology

, Volume 46, Issue 4, pp 781–790 | Cite as

Surface functionalization of bamboo with nanostructured ZnO

  • Yan Yu
  • Zehui Jiang
  • Ge Wang
  • Genlin Tian
  • Hankun Wang
  • Ye Song
Original

Abstract

Imparting excellent preservative performances to bamboo is the key to expand the applications of this extraordinary non-wood forest resource. This study reports on the formation of ZnO-nanostructured network films on the surface of bamboo via a simple two-step process. This process consists of the generation of ZnO seeds on the bamboo surface followed by a solution treatment to promote the crystal growth. The morphology and chemical composition of the ZnO films were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction. Accelerated weathering was used to evaluate the photostability of the treated wood. The antifungal and antibacterial performances were also examined. The results indicate that the approach can simultaneously furnish bamboo with excellent photostability and antifungal and antibacterial performances. The growth mechanism of ZnO-nanostructured network films on the uneven and chemically complicated surface of bamboo was also discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yan Yu
    • 1
  • Zehui Jiang
    • 1
  • Ge Wang
    • 1
  • Genlin Tian
    • 1
  • Hankun Wang
    • 1
  • Ye Song
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiomaterialsInternational Center for Bamboo and RattanBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of MaterialsCentral South Forestry Science and Technology UniversityChangshaChina

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