Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 102, Issue 5, pp 503–511 | Cite as

Overview of Osteoimmunology

Review

Abstract

Aberrant or prolonged immune responses often affect bone metabolism. The investigation on bone destruction observed in autoimmune arthritis contributed to the development of research area on effect of the immune system on bone. A number of reports on bone phenotypes of immunocompromised mice indicate that the immune and skeletal systems share various molecules, including transcription factors, signaling molecules, and membrane receptors, suggesting the interplay between the two systems. Furthermore, much attention has been paid to the modulation of immune cells, including hematopoietic progenitor cells, by bone cells in the bone marrow. Thus, osteoimmunology which deals with the crosstalk and shared mechanisms of the bone and immune systems became the conceptual framework fundamental to a proper understanding of both systems and the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Keywords

Osteoimmunology Bone metabolism Immune regulation Bone marrow microenvironment RANKL 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Osteoimmunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of MedicineThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of MedicineThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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