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Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 120, Issue 4, pp 417–431 | Cite as

Effects of pre-cues on voluntary and reflexive saccade generation II. Pro-cues for anti-saccades

II. Pro-cues for anti-saccades
  • Heike Weber
  • Norbert Dürr
  • B. Fischer
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Abstract 

The reaction times of saccades (SRT) to a suddenly presented visual stimulus (pro-saccade) can be decreased and a separate mode of express saccades can occur when a gap paradigm is used (i.e. fixation-point offset precedes target onset by 200 ms). A valid peripheral cue, presented briefly (100 ms) before target onset, has been found to facilitate the generation of saccades to the target, thereby increasing the frequency of express saccades and decreasing the mean latency. This facilitation occurs only for cues that correctly indicate the direction of the subsequent target presentation (valid cues). The present study investigates the effects of valid cues on SRTs and error rate in the anti-saccade task (saccades in the direction opposite to the stimulus) by systematically varying the cue lead time (CLT) and using the gap and overlap conditions, i.e. fixation point remains on throughout the trial. For a CLT of 100 ms, both reaction times and error rates were significantly increased. With increasing CLT (200–500 ms), both the reaction times of the anti-saccades and the error rates returned to approximately control level, with CLT more than 200 ms in both the gap and the overlap condition. Additional experiments using non-informative cues in the overlap task showed that the reaction times of correct anti-saccades and the error rate were decreased when cue and stimulus appeared at the same side. Analysis of the erratic pro-saccades revealed that almost all of them were corrected, i.e. they were followed by a second saccade towards the required location. It is found that the correction times were usually very short, with intersaccadic intervals between 0 and 150 ms. We suggest that the orienting mechanism, elicited by a transient peripheral cue, relates to the command and the decision to make a pro- rather than an anti-saccade. The cue elicits pro-orienting towards its position when a pro-saccade is required, and anti-orienting when an anti-saccade is required. The orienting effect is transient and decays with CLTs of more than 200 ms; this result holds for both anti-saccades and pro-saccades. Since subjects reported that they could not prevent the erratic pro-saccades or were often not aware of them, we conclude that this orienting mechanism occurs automatically, beyond voluntary control.

Key words Attention Orienting Saccadic reaction time Express saccade Anti-saccade Gap effect Human 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heike Weber
    • 1
  • Norbert Dürr
    • 1
  • B. Fischer
    • 1
  1. 1.Brain Research Unit, Institute of Biophysics, Hansastrasse 9, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany e-mail: bfischer@uni-freiburg.de, Fax: +49-761-2039540DE

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