Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 190, Issue 3, pp 347–359

A spinal pathway between synergists can modulate activity in human elbow flexor muscles

  • Benjamin K. Barry
  • Zachary A. Riley
  • Michael A. Pascoe
  • Roger M. Enoka
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-008-1479-5

Cite this article as:
Barry, B.K., Riley, Z.A., Pascoe, M.A. et al. Exp Brain Res (2008) 190: 347. doi:10.1007/s00221-008-1479-5

Abstract

Electrical stimulation of the brachioradialis branch of the radial nerve has been shown to inhibit the discharge of voluntarily activated motor units in biceps brachii during weak contractions with the elbow flexor muscles. The purpose of the present study was to characterise the inhibitory reflex by comparing its strength in the short and long heads of the biceps brachii and examining the influence of forearm position on the strength of the reflex. Spike-triggered stimulation was used to assess the influence of radial nerve stimulation on the discharge of single motor units in the biceps brachii of 15 subjects. Stimulation of the radial nerve prolonged the interspike interval (P < 0.001) of motor units in the long (n = 31, 4.8 ± 5.6 ms) and short heads (n = 26, 8.1 ± 12.3 ms) of biceps brachii with no difference between the two heads (P = 0.11). The strength of inhibition varied with forearm position for motor units in both heads (n = 18, P < 0.05). The amount of inhibition was greatest in pronation (7.9 ± 8.9 ms), intermediate in neutral (5.8 ± 7.1 ms), and least in supination (2.8 ± 3.4 ms). These findings indicate that the inhibition evoked by afferent feedback from brachioradialis to low-threshold motor units (mean force 3–5% MVC) in biceps brachii varied with forearm posture yet was similar for the two heads of biceps brachii. This reflex pathway provides a mechanism to adjust the activation of biceps brachii with changes in forearm position, and represents a spinal basis for a muscle synergy in humans.

Keywords

Motor unit Inhibition Biceps brachii Brachioradialis Synergy 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin K. Barry
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zachary A. Riley
    • 1
  • Michael A. Pascoe
    • 1
  • Roger M. Enoka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Integrative PhysiologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.School of Medical SciencesThe University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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