Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 182, Issue 2, pp 275–279 | Cite as

Left handedness does not extend to visually guided precision grasping

  • Claudia L. R. Gonzalez
  • R. L. Whitwell
  • B. Morrissey
  • T. Ganel
  • M. A. Goodale
Research Note

Abstract

In the present study, we measured spontaneous hand preference in a “natural” grasping task. We asked right- and left-handed subjects to put a puzzle together or to create different LEGO© models, as quickly and as accurately as possible, without any instruction about which hand to use. Their hand movements were videotaped and hand preference for grasping in ipsilateral and contralateral space was measured. Right handers showed a marked preference for their dominant hand when picking up objects; left handers, however, did not show this preference and instead used their right hand 50% of the time. Furthermore, compared to right handers, left handers used their non-dominant hand significantly more often to pick up objects in ipsilateral as well as contralateral space. Our results show that handedness in left handers does not extend to precision grasp and suggest that right handedness for visuomotor control may reflect a universal left-hemisphere specialization for this class of behaviour.

Keywords

Grasping Left-handers Left hemisphere Visuomotor 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by grants to M.A.G. from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Canada Research Chairs Program, and a CIHR postdoctoral fellowship to C.L.R.G. Authors would like to thank Dr. Haitao Yang for technical support.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia L. R. Gonzalez
    • 1
  • R. L. Whitwell
    • 1
  • B. Morrissey
    • 1
  • T. Ganel
    • 2
  • M. A. Goodale
    • 1
  1. 1.CIHR Group on Action and Perception, Department of PsychologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Behavioral SciencesBen-Gurion University of the NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael

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