Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 184, Issue 1, pp 39–52

Modality-specific selective attention attenuates multisensory integration

  • Jennifer L. Mozolic
  • Christina E. Hugenschmidt
  • Ann M. Peiffer
  • Paul J. Laurienti
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-007-1080-3

Cite this article as:
Mozolic, J.L., Hugenschmidt, C.E., Peiffer, A.M. et al. Exp Brain Res (2008) 184: 39. doi:10.1007/s00221-007-1080-3

Abstract

Stimuli occurring in multiple sensory modalities that are temporally synchronous or spatially coincident can be integrated together to enhance perception. Additionally, the semantic content or meaning of a stimulus can influence cross-modal interactions, improving task performance when these stimuli convey semantically congruent or matching information, but impairing performance when they contain non-matching or distracting information. Attention is one mechanism that is known to alter processing of sensory stimuli by enhancing perception of task-relevant information and suppressing perception of task-irrelevant stimuli. It is not known, however, to what extent attention to a single sensory modality can minimize the impact of stimuli in the unattended sensory modality and reduce the integration of stimuli across multiple sensory modalities. Our hypothesis was that modality-specific selective attention would limit processing of stimuli in the unattended sensory modality, resulting in a reduction of performance enhancements produced by semantically matching multisensory stimuli, and a reduction in performance decrements produced by semantically non-matching multisensory stimuli. The results from two experiments utilizing a cued discrimination task demonstrate that selective attention to a single sensory modality prevents the integration of matching multisensory stimuli that is normally observed when attention is divided between sensory modalities. Attention did not reliably alter the amount of distraction caused by non-matching multisensory stimuli on this task; however, these findings highlight a critical role for modality-specific selective attention in modulating multisensory integration.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Mozolic
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christina E. Hugenschmidt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ann M. Peiffer
    • 2
  • Paul J. Laurienti
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate Program in NeuroscienceWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  2. 2.ANSIR Laboratory, Department of RadiologyWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA

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