European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 227, Issue 2, pp 565–570 | Cite as

Utilization of Mixolab® to predict the suitability of flours in terms of cake quality

  • Kevser Kahraman
  • Ozge Sakıyan
  • Serpil Ozturk
  • Hamit Koksel
  • Gulum Sumnu
  • Arnaud Dubat
Original Paper

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the possibility of using Mixolab® to predict the cake baking quality of different wheat flours. Mixolab® data were also compared with various flour quality characteristics. The correlations between Alveoconsistograph data and the cake quality characteristics were not significant. Therefore, Alveoconsistograph test does not seem to be useful to predict the cake quality of the flour samples. Mixolab® characteristics C2, C3, C4 and C5 were found to be significantly correlated with volume index while C5 was correlated with hardness of cakes. The parameters C2 to C5 represent the end point of the corresponding mixing stages. The flour samples which gave higher cake hardness values had higher C5 values and the samples with lower cake volumes had higher C2, C3, C4 and C5 values. It seems to be possible to estimate the texture and volume of cakes by these values. Therefore, Mixolab® seems to be a useful tool to predict the cake making quality of flour samples.

Keywords

Mixolab® Cake volume Cake hardness Flour quality 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevser Kahraman
    • 1
  • Ozge Sakıyan
    • 2
  • Serpil Ozturk
    • 1
  • Hamit Koksel
    • 1
  • Gulum Sumnu
    • 2
  • Arnaud Dubat
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringHacettepe UniversityBeytepe, AnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Food Engineering DepartmentMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Flour and Food DepartmentChopin TechnologiesVilleneuve la GarenneFrance

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