European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 226, Issue 3, pp 561–567 | Cite as

Effect of two different rice dehusking procedures on total arsenic concentration in rice

  • A. Signes
  • K. Mitra
  • F. Burló
  • A. A. Carbonell-Barrachina
Original Paper

Abstract

Pollution of subterranean water by arsenic (As) in Asia has resulted in the worst chemical disaster in human history. For populations living on subsistence rice diets, As contamination of rice grain contributes greatly to dietary As exposure. The main objectives of this study were to compare two dehusking processes: (a) wet process (soaking of rice, boiling and mechanical hulling) and (b) dry process (mechanical hulling), and recommend the method leading to a lower As content in commercial rice. In general, hulling of paddy rice (373 μg As kg−1) significantly decreased As content in rice grain (311 μg As kg−1). The final As concentrations in boiled rice (final product of the wet process) and atab rice (dry process) were 332 and 290 μg kg−1. Thus, the dry method is recommended for dehusking paddy rice if not As-free water is available. However, villagers can reduce the As content in the wet system by discarding the soaking water and using new water for the light boiling. Finally, it is not recommended to use rice husk for feeding animals because the As concentration is very high, approximately 1,000 μg As kg−1.

Keywords

Animal feed Hulling Husk Paddy rice West Bengal 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union (Development of a low cost technology for in situ treatment of groundwater for potable and irrigation purposes, TIPOT, ASI/B7-301/2598/24-2004/79013) and Caja de Ahorros del Mediterráneo (CAM-2006). The contents of this document are the sole responsibility of UMH and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union and/or CAM.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Signes
    • 1
  • K. Mitra
    • 2
  • F. Burló
    • 1
  • A. A. Carbonell-Barrachina
    • 1
  1. 1.Agro-Food Technology DepartmentMiguel Hernández UniversityOrihuelaSpain
  2. 2.Institute of Advanced StudiesRamakrishna Vivekananda MissionKolkataIndia

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