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European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 226, Issue 3, pp 345–353 | Cite as

The effect of three organic pre-harvest treatments on Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. var. cycla L.) quality

  • Nancy Daiss
  • M. Gloria Lobo
  • Ana R. Socorro
  • Ulrich Brückner
  • Joachim Heller
  • Monica Gonzalez
Original Paper

Abstract

Despite the increasing interest in organic products, our understanding of how different organic treatments affect fruit and vegetable quality is still limited. The effect of three organic pre-harvest treatments [effective microorganisms (EM), a fermented mixture of effective microorganisms with organic matter (EM-Bokashi + EM), and an auxiliary soil product (Greengold®)] on Swiss chard quality was evaluated. The Swiss chard was analyzed 8 and 19 weeks after sowing. The treatments did not notably modify the physical and chemical quality of the chard when compared with control plants. Chard harvested 19 weeks after sowing showed greater differences in nutritional quality than chard harvested 8 weeks after sowing. Control plants had higher water content than the plants treated with EM, EM-Bokashi + EM and Greengold®. Chards treated with EM-Bokashi + EM had lower ascorbic acid content and higher phosphor and magnesium content than control plants. Application of EM to plants induced higher levels of calcium compared with non-treated plants.

Keywords

Organic production Effective microorganisms Bokashi Greengold® Physical and chemical quality Nutritional quality Swiss chard 

Notes

Acknowledgments

M. Gonzalez would like to thank INIA for awarding contract with the framework of the “Recursos y Tecnologías Agrarias del Plan Nacional de Investigación Científica, Desarrollo e Innovación Tecnológica 2000–2003” strategic action.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Daiss
    • 1
  • M. Gloria Lobo
    • 1
  • Ana R. Socorro
    • 1
  • Ulrich Brückner
    • 2
  • Joachim Heller
    • 3
  • Monica Gonzalez
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Canario de Investigaciones AgrariasLa LagunaSpain
  2. 2.Research Center Geisenheim, Section of Soil FertilityGeisenheimGermany
  3. 3.Fachhochschule Wiesbaden, Standort GeisenheimGeisenheimGermany

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