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European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 221, Issue 3–4, pp 547–549 | Cite as

Fatty acid profile and mineral content of the wild snail (Helix pomatia) from the region of the south of the Turkey

  • Yesim Özogul
  • Fatih Özogul
  • A. Ilkan Olgunoglu
Original Paper

Abstract

The fatty acid and mineral compositions in the flesh of wild snail (Helix pomatia) collected in the region of Cukurova in Turkey were evaluated. Proximate analysis of snails showed that they are rich in protein (18%) and low in lipid (0.49%). The main fatty acids detected were C16:0 (12%) C18:0 (19%), C22:0 (7%), C18:1 n−9 (17%), C18:2 n−6 (16%) and C20:2 n−11.14c (10%). The total SFA, MUFA and PUFA content of lipids were 37.87, 19.65 and 25.83% of total fatty acids, respectively. The major minerals found were Ca, P, K, Mg and Na. However, Fe, Mn and Zn contents of snail meat are less than 2 mg/100 g. The results of this study have showed that snails are good sources of protein and minerals.

Keywords

Helix Pomatia, Proximate analysis Fatty acids Mineral contents 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yesim Özogul
    • 1
  • Fatih Özogul
    • 1
  • A. Ilkan Olgunoglu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Fishing and Fish Processing Technology, Faculty of FisheriesUniversity of CukurovaAdanaTurkey

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