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European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 221, Issue 6, pp 787–791 | Cite as

Determination of astaxanthin and canthaxanthin in salmonid

  • S. Tolasa
  • S. CakliEmail author
  • U. Ostermeyer
Original Paper

Abstract

Total carotenoid (astaxanthin, cantaxanthin) content were determined in 60 traditionally cultured salmons (ICL, N1CL, N2CL) (Salmo salar), 10 natural salmons (NWL) (S. salar), 20 ecological cultured salmons (IECL) (S. salar), 20 ecological cultured rainbow trouts (NECR) (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 20 traditional cultured rainbow trouts (NCR) (O. mykis). Quantitative and qualitative carotenoid determination was carried out using spectrophotometric method and thin layer chromatography method, respectively. For pigmentation, astaxanthin was determined as the most important carotenoid. Total carotenoid concentration in traditional cultured salmon, natural salmon, ecologically cultured salmon, ecologically and traditionally cultured rainbow trout was determined as 673–1014, 644–708, 714–904, 56–57, and 291–391 Eg/100 g respectively. Carotinoid concentration in traditional cultured salmon was higher than the carotenoid concentration in natural salmon and ecological cultured salmon. The lowest carotenoid concentration was determined in the ecological cultured rainbow trout (O. mykiss).

Keywords

Astaxanthin Canthaxanthin Salmo salar Oncorhynchus mykiss TLC Spectrophotometer 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Fisheries Department of Processing TechnologyEge UniversitätBornovaTürkei
  2. 2.Research Department for Fish QualityFederal Research Centre for Nutrition and FoodHamburgGermany

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