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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 409, Issue 4, pp 1007–1016 | Cite as

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry reveals changes of phospholipid distribution in induced pluripotent stem cell colony differentiation

  • Yasuo ShimizuEmail author
  • Motoyasu Satou
  • Keitaro Hayashi
  • Yusuke Nakamura
  • Mio Fujimaki
  • Yasuhiro Horibata
  • Hiromi Ando
  • Taiji Watanabe
  • Taichi Shiobara
  • Kazuyuki Chibana
  • Akihiro Takemasa
  • Hiroyuki Sugimoto
  • Naohiko Anzai
  • Yoshiki Ishii
Research Paper

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are opening up new possibilities for medicine. Understanding the regulation of iPSC biology is important when attempting to apply these cells to disease models or therapy. Changes of lipid metabolism in iPSCs were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-IMS). Analysis revealed changes of the intensity and distribution of peaks at m/z 782.5 and 798.5 in iPSC colonies during spontaneous differentiation. Two phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were identified: C44H81NO8P, PC(36:4)[M+H]+ at m/z 782.5 and C42H82NO8P, PC(34:1)[M+K]+ at m/z 798.5. The intensity of PC(36:4) showed an inverse relation between undifferentiated and differentiated iPSC colonies. PC(34:1) displayed a diffuse distribution in undifferentiated iPSC colonies, while it showed a concentric distribution in differentiated iPSC colonies, and was localized at the border of the differentiated and undifferentiated areas or the border between undifferentiated iPSC and feeder cells. These findings suggested that the distribution of lipids changes during the growth and differentiation of iPSCs and that MALDI-TOF-IMS was useful for analyzing these changes. PC(36:4) might play a role in maintaining pluripotency, while PC(34:1) might play a role in the differentiation and spread of iPSCs.

Graphical Abstract

MALDI Imaging for phosphatidylcholine distribution changes during sponteneous differentiaton of induced pluiripotent stem cells colonies

Keywords

iPS Phospholipids Phosphatidylcholine MALDI Imaging Differentiation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partly supported by a grant-in-aid for the MEXT KAKENHI Grant, Japan (S1412001) and JSPS KAKENHI Grant, Japan (16K09553). The authors are grateful to Isao Asaka [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University] for advice on iPSC culture and to Satomi Tateno, Mio Maekawa, and Sachiko Nakadate (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dokkyo Medical University) for assistance with iMscope analysis, as well as Akiko Horigane (Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical Immunology) for assistance with cell culture.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interests.

Supplementary material

216_2016_15_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.3 mb)
ESM 1 (PDF 1362 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuo Shimizu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Motoyasu Satou
    • 2
  • Keitaro Hayashi
    • 3
  • Yusuke Nakamura
    • 1
  • Mio Fujimaki
    • 1
  • Yasuhiro Horibata
    • 2
  • Hiromi Ando
    • 2
  • Taiji Watanabe
    • 1
  • Taichi Shiobara
    • 1
  • Kazuyuki Chibana
    • 1
  • Akihiro Takemasa
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Sugimoto
    • 2
  • Naohiko Anzai
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yoshiki Ishii
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical ImmunologyDokkyo Medical University School of MedicineMibuJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryDokkyo Medical University School of MedicineMibuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and ToxicologyDokkyo Medical University School of MedicineMibuJapan
  4. 4.Department of PharmacologyChiba University Graduate School of MedicineChuoJapan

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