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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 407, Issue 29, pp 8925–8929 | Cite as

Quantitative SERS studies by combining LOC-SERS with the standard addition method

  • Evelyn Kämmer
  • Konstanze Olschewski
  • Stephan Stöckel
  • Petra Rösch
  • Karina Weber
  • Dana Cialla-May
  • Thomas Bocklitz
  • Jürgen Popp
Note

Abstract

Here, we report on a proof-of-concept study highlighting a new approach for quantitative surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements. This has been achieved by implementing the standard addition method (SAM) within a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system. The approach has been successfully tested to quantify congo red as a model analyte even in the presence of the chemically related molecule methyl red. Thus, the developed concept demonstrates its potential to quantify analytes via SERS in the presence of other SERS active molecules.

Graphical Abstract

Congo red was quantified by means of the standard addition method implemented in the lab-on-a-chip device. Due to the developed approach, a direct detection out of the sample and in the presence of an interfering substance was possible.

Keywords

SERS Lab-on-a-chip Standard addition method Congo red 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Free State of Thuringia and the European Union (EFRE) under support code 13022-715 (BioInter) and by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research under support code 03IPT513Y (InnoProfile-Transfer Nachwuchsgruppe: Jenaer Biochip Initiative 2.0). We gratefully acknowledge the microfluidic group of the IPHT (Institute of Photonic Technology, Germany) and in particular Eileen Heinrich for the fabrication and regeneration of the microfluidic chips.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Supplementary material

216_2015_9045_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (43 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 42 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evelyn Kämmer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Konstanze Olschewski
    • 1
  • Stephan Stöckel
    • 1
    • 3
  • Petra Rösch
    • 1
    • 3
  • Karina Weber
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dana Cialla-May
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas Bocklitz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jürgen Popp
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University JenaJenaGermany
  2. 2.Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT)JenaGermany
  3. 3.InfectoGnostics Forschungscampus Jena e.V., Zentrum für Angewandte ForschungJenaGermany

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