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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 407, Issue 28, pp 8385–8396 | Cite as

Introduction of regulations for arsenic in feed and food with emphasis on inorganic arsenic, and implications for analytical chemistry

  • Asta H. PetursdottirEmail author
  • Jens J. Sloth
  • Jörg FeldmannEmail author
Feature Article

Introduction

Regulators have been reluctant to set maximum levels (ML) for arsenic in food because of the molecular diversity of the arsenic species present. Arsenic levels in food can vary by several orders of magnitude, with the arsenic present in many different molecular forms which vary substantially in toxicity [ 1]. Arsenic in food is found as a multitude of different organoarsenic species and as inorganic arsenic (iAs). iAs is regarded as the most toxic form of arsenic in food and feed and is classified as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) [ 2]. Organoarsenic species are, in general, believed to be of low toxicity or even non-toxic, e.g., most of the arsenic in fish occurs as non-toxic arsenobetaine [ 1, 3]. Because of this complexity, setting maximum levels for regulation of total arsenic is not believed to adequately reflect the risk of food products to human health. Francesconi [ 4] stressed this when considering the need for speciation of...

Keywords

Arsenic Husk Rice Proficiency Test Arsenic Species Inorganic Arsenic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no potential conflict of interest.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Matis, Environment, Food Safety and Genetics DepartmentReykjavikIceland
  2. 2.National Food InstituteTechnical University of DenmarkSoborgDenmark
  3. 3.Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Chemistry DepartmentAberdeenUK

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