Use of the MALDI BioTyper system with MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry for rapid identification of microorganisms

  • Kazuyuki Sogawa
  • Masaharu Watanabe
  • Kenichi Sato
  • Syunsuke Segawa
  • Chisato Ishii
  • Akiko Miyabe
  • Syota Murata
  • Tomoko Saito
  • Fumio Nomura
Original Paper

Abstract

In a clinical diagnosis microbiology laboratory, the current method of identifying bacterial isolates is based mainly on phenotypic characteristics, for example growth pattern on different media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions. These techniques collectively enable great accuracy in identifying most bacterial isolates, but are costly and time-consuming. In our clinical microbiology laboratory, we prospectively assessed the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF MS) to identify bacterial strains that were routinely isolated from clinical samples. Bacterial colonies obtained from a total of 468 strains of 92 bacterial species isolated at the Department of Clinical Laboratory at Chiba University were directly placed on target MALDI plates followed by addition of CHCA matrix solution. The plates were then subjected to MALDI–TOF MS measurement and the microorganisms were identified by pattern matching with the libraries in the BioTyper 2.0 software. Identification success at the species and genus levels was 91.7% (429/468) and 97.0% (454/468), respectively. MALDI–TOF MS is a rapid, simple, and high-throughput proteomic technique for identification of a variety of bacterial species. Because colony-to-colony differences and effects of culture duration on the results are minimal, it can be implemented in a conventional laboratory setting. Although for some pathogens, preanalytical processes should be refined, and the current database should be improved to obtain more accurate results, the MALDI–TOF MS based method performs, in general, as well as conventional methods and is a promising technology in clinical laboratories.

Keywords

Rapid microorganism identification Clinical sample MALDI–TOF MS MALDI BioTyper 

Supplementary material

216_2011_4877_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (50 kb)
Table S1 Identification of isolates using the conventional method vs. the MALDI-TOF MS-based method. (PDF 49 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuyuki Sogawa
    • 1
  • Masaharu Watanabe
    • 2
  • Kenichi Sato
    • 2
  • Syunsuke Segawa
    • 2
  • Chisato Ishii
    • 2
  • Akiko Miyabe
    • 2
  • Syota Murata
    • 2
  • Tomoko Saito
    • 2
  • Fumio Nomura
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Clinical Proteomics Research CenterChiba University HospitalChiba CityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Clinical LaboratoryChiba University HospitalChiba CityJapan
  3. 3.Department of Molecular Diagnosis, Graduate School of MedicineChiba UniversityChiba CityJapan

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