Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 398, Issue 3, pp 1329–1338

Bioactive molecules in Kalanchoe pinnata leaves: extraction, purification, and identification

  • Saïda El Abdellaoui
  • Emilie Destandau
  • Alix Toribio
  • Claire Elfakir
  • Michel Lafosse
  • Isabelle Renimel
  • Patrice André
  • Perrine Cancellieri
  • Ludovic Landemarre
Original Paper

Abstract

Kalanchoe pinnata (Lam.) Pers. (syn. Bryophyllum pinnatum; family Crassulaceae) is a popular plant used in traditional medicine in many temperate regions of the world and particularly in South America. In Guyana, the leaves are traditionally used as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic to treat coughs, ulcers, and sores. The purpose of this study was to implement a method for targeting and identifying molecules with antimicrobial activity, which could replace chemical preservatives in cosmetic applications. The leaves were extracted by a method based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), using different solvents. A study of antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity tests were performed to select the most interesting extract. To isolate one or more active molecules, the selected crude extract was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and then antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of each fraction were tested under the same procedure. The last step consisted of identifying the main compounds in the most active fraction by LC-MS/MS.

Keywords

Kalanchoe pinnata Centrifugal partition chromatography LC/MS/MS Antimicrobial activity Cytotoxicity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saïda El Abdellaoui
    • 1
  • Emilie Destandau
    • 1
  • Alix Toribio
    • 1
  • Claire Elfakir
    • 1
  • Michel Lafosse
    • 1
  • Isabelle Renimel
    • 2
  • Patrice André
    • 2
  • Perrine Cancellieri
    • 3
  • Ludovic Landemarre
    • 3
  1. 1.Institut de Chimie Organique et AnalytiqueUniversité d’Orléans–CNRS, UMR CNRS 6005Orléans Cedex 2France
  2. 2.Département Innovation ActifsLVMH Recherche Parfums et CosmétiquesSaint Jean de BrayeFrance
  3. 3.GLYcoDIAGUniversité d’OrléansOrléans Cedex 2France

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