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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 398, Issue 2, pp 729–736 | Cite as

Plasmonics nanoprobes: detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene

  • Musundi B. Wabuyele
  • Fei Yan
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper describes the application of plasmonics-based nanoprobes that combine the modulation of the plasmonics effect to change the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a Raman label and the specificity of a DNA hairpin loop sequence to recognize and discriminate a variety of molecular target sequences. Hybridization with target DNA opens the hairpin and physically separates the Raman label from the metal nanoparticle thus reducing the plasmonics effect and quenching the SERS signal of the label. We have successfully demonstrated the specificity and selectivity of the nanoprobes in the detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene in a homogenous solution at room temperature. In addition, the potential application of plasmonics nanoprobes for quantitative DNA diagnostic testing is discussed.

Keywords

Plasmonics Surface-enhanced Raman scattering Single-nucleotide polymorphism Breast cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was partly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (Project # R01 EB006201), and by the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research under contract No. DEAC0500OR22725 with UT-Battelle, L.L.C. M. B. Wabuyele was also supported by an appointment to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Postdoctoral Research Associates Program, administered jointly by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

Supplementary material

216_2010_3992_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (510 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 509 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.GlaxoSmithKlineCollegevilleUSA
  2. 2.Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Department of Biomedical EngineeringDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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