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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 397, Issue 5, pp 1965–1973 | Cite as

Key parameters for the development of a NIR microscopic method for the quantification of processed by-products of animal origin in compound feedingstuffs

  • O. Abbas
  • J. A. Fernández Pierna
  • A. Boix
  • C. von Holst
  • P. Dardenne
  • V. Baeten
Original Paper

Abstract

The aim of this work is to show new advances in the analytical methods developed in the frame of the ban of processed animal by-products in compound feed that is currently applied within the European Union. With this aim, studies to develop a quantitative near infrared microscopy (NIRM) approach have been undertaken in order to fulfil future requirements of European legislation like the introduction of tolerance levels that would require for official control purposes the availability of specific quantitative methods. The capabilities of the NIRM method have been improved; no sample preparation is required and the acquisition parameters are optimised. Both the gross and the fine fractions of the samples are considered; the reflexion mode was used to analyse the gross raw fraction and the transmission mode was chosen to analyse the fine raw fraction. Parameters for reflexion analyses were already fixed in our previous studies while those of transmission mode have been determined in the present study. Because particles are too small, it is difficult to mark them; spectra were collected using the mapping technique. Quantitative analyses have been carried out for different percentages of adulteration (0.5, 1, 2 and 5%). Results were depending on the particle size distribution of the feed and of the fish meal which led to experimental values of adulteration varying between 0.13–0.92%, 0.93–3.7%, 2.42–5.83% and 1.95–9.39% for theoretical percentages of adulteration equal to 0.5, 1, 2 and 5%, respectively. The established protocol with the key parameters proposed has to be considered for the development of an accurate method of quantification.

Keywords

NIR microscopy Transmission Mapping Animal feed Contamination Quantification 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the European Commission, through the Sixth Framework Programme (under the Integrating and strengthening the European Research Area Specific Targeted Project) as part of the SAFEED-PAP project (FOOD-CT-2006-036221) (http://safeedpap.feedsafety.org/) for funding partly this work.

The information contained in this article reflects the authors’ views; the European Commission is not liable for any use of the information contained therein.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Abbas
    • 1
  • J. A. Fernández Pierna
    • 1
  • A. Boix
    • 2
  • C. von Holst
    • 2
  • P. Dardenne
    • 1
  • V. Baeten
    • 1
  1. 1.Food and Feed Quality Unit (U15), Valorisation of Agricultural Products DepartmentWalloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W)GemblouxBelgium
  2. 2.European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and MeasurementsGeelBelgium

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