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Psychopharmacology

, Volume 223, Issue 2, pp 247–249 | Cite as

Sulpiride and refractory panic disorder

  • Emerson A. Nunes
  • Rafael C. Freire
  • Moema dos Reis
  • Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira e Silva
  • Sérgio Machado
  • José A. S. Crippa
  • Serdar M. Dursun
  • Glen B. Baker
  • Jaime E. C. Hallak
  • Antonio E. Nardi
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

The use of antipsychotics in patients with anxiety in recent years has increased, with a recent study showing that over a 12-year period, antipsychotic prescriptions in visits for anxiety disorders increased from 10.6 to 21.3 %, with the biggest increase among panic disorder (PD) patients (from 8 to 21.3 %) (Comer et al. 2011). Reasons for this remain unclear, but possible explanations include changes in patient characteristics, including increasing severity of illnesses among outpatient clients; greater prevalence or recognition of comorbidities (Comer et al. 2011); greater physician emphasis on symptom reduction, with increased acceptance of off-label antipsychotic prescriptions; a possible extrapolation to anxiety subjects by psychiatrists from their clinical experience of treating depressed patients with antipsychotics (Berman et al. 2009); and the availability of new antipsychotics with better side effect profiles, leading to a trend of changing from typical to...

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Panic Disorder Sulpiride Amisulpride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The grant for this trial was provided by the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and the National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM). Drs. Nardi, Hallak, and Crippa are recipients of CNPq productivity fellowship awards. The authors declare that they have full control of all primary data and that they agree to allow the journal to review the data if requested.

Conflict of interest

The authors also declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emerson A. Nunes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rafael C. Freire
    • 3
  • Moema dos Reis
    • 3
  • Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira e Silva
    • 3
  • Sérgio Machado
    • 3
  • José A. S. Crippa
    • 1
  • Serdar M. Dursun
    • 2
  • Glen B. Baker
    • 2
  • Jaime E. C. Hallak
    • 1
  • Antonio E. Nardi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Neuroscience and Behavior, Ribeirão Preto Medical SchoolUniversity of São Paulo, National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM)Ribeirão PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Neurochemical Research Unit, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.Panic and Respiration Laboratory, Institute of PsychiatryFederal University of Rio de Janeiro, National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM)Rio de JaneiroBrazil

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