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Psychopharmacology

, Volume 214, Issue 3, pp 719–728 | Cite as

Lack of association between 71 variations located in candidate genes and response to acute haloperidol treatment

  • Ina Giegling
  • Antonio Drago
  • Martin Schäfer
  • Annette M. Hartmann
  • Thomas Sander
  • Mohammad Reza Toliat
  • Hans-Jürgen Möller
  • Diana De Ronchi
  • Hans H. Stassen
  • Dan Rujescu
  • Alessandro SerrettiEmail author
Original Investigation

Abstract

Rationale

The antipsychotic pharmacological treatment effectiveness and side effects are at least partially driven by the genetic personal background.

Objectives

In the present study, 71 genetic variations located in 21 candidate genes were investigated as modulators of the haloperidol efficacy and side effects in a sample of 101 acutely ill psychotic patients.

Methods

Patients were assessed at days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) test) and days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 (UKU, BAS, and ESRS tests). Haloperidol plasma levels were measured at the same timepoints.

Results

None of the 71 variations were associated with response to treatment or with incidence of side effects passed a multiple testing threshold. A marginal association was detected between two haplotypes within the signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 gene and PANSS positive and dopamine beta-hydroxylase with PANSS negative scores (p = 0.004 and p = 0.008, respectively).

Conclusions

In conclusion, no major association was observed between the investigated variations and the efficacy profile of haloperidol.

Keywords

Haloperidol Schizophrenia Pharmacogenetics Tolerability 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ina Giegling
    • 1
  • Antonio Drago
    • 2
  • Martin Schäfer
    • 1
    • 5
  • Annette M. Hartmann
    • 1
  • Thomas Sander
    • 4
  • Mohammad Reza Toliat
    • 4
  • Hans-Jürgen Möller
    • 1
  • Diana De Ronchi
    • 2
  • Hans H. Stassen
    • 3
  • Dan Rujescu
    • 1
  • Alessandro Serretti
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryLudwig Maximilians UniversityMunichGermany
  2. 2.Institute of PsychiatryUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  3. 3.Psychiatric University HospitalZurichSwitzerland
  4. 4.Cologne Center for GenomicsUniversity of CologneCologneGermany
  5. 5.Kliniken Essen MitteEssenGermany

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