Psychopharmacology

, Volume 184, Issue 3–4, pp 286–291 | Cite as

Nicotine psychopharmacology research contributions to United States and global tobacco regulation: a look back and a look forward

Commentary

Abstract

Nicotine has a long and storied history in physiology and pharmacology. Historically, it has been used as a tool to explore the nervous system, studied for its role in tobacco use, and more recently examined for its diverse potential medicinal uses. Psychopharmacology research has been pivotal in the science foundation for nicotine and tobacco product regulation.

Keywords

Nicotine Tobacco Psychopharmacology Abuse liability Dependence potential Addiction Policy Regulatory History Public Health 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Jack Henningfield was supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Innovators Awards Program in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He and Mitch Zeller provide consulting services to GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare for smoking control medicines. Jack Henningfield has a financial interest in a smoking control medicine. Sara Hughes assisted in preparation and review of the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pinney AssociatesBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.The Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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