Psychopharmacology

, Volume 166, Issue 4, pp 343–350

Efficacy of acute administration of nicotine gum in relief of cue-provoked cigarette craving

  • Saul Shiffman
  • William G. Shadel
  • Raymond Niaura
  • Moise A. Khayrallah
  • Douglas E. Jorenby
  • Charles F. Ryan
  • Clifford L. Ferguson
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00213-002-1338-1

Cite this article as:
Shiffman, S., Shadel, W.G., Niaura, R. et al. Psychopharmacology (2003) 166: 343. doi:10.1007/s00213-002-1338-1

Abstract

Rationale

Acute cravings, often provoked by exposure to smoking cues, appear to be important triggers for smoking relapse. Relief of acute craving may therefore be an important step in preventing relapse.

Objectives

This study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of nicotine gum in relieving acute craving.

Methods

A multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted with smokers (n=296) who quit by using either active or inactive gum for 3 days. On their third day of abstinence, smokers participated in a laboratory session in which they were exposed to a provocative smoking cue, chewed active or inactive gum, and then rated their craving at 5-min intervals for 35 min.

Results

Craving initially decreased in both groups. After 15 min, however, the smokers using active nicotine gum experienced significantly greater craving reductions.

Conclusions

These results suggest that nicotine gum can effectively reduce acute craving following exposure to smoking cues.

Keywords

Nicotine replacement Smoking cessation Craving Cue reactivity Nicotine gum 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saul Shiffman
    • 1
  • William G. Shadel
    • 2
  • Raymond Niaura
    • 2
  • Moise A. Khayrallah
    • 3
  • Douglas E. Jorenby
    • 4
  • Charles F. Ryan
    • 5
  • Clifford L. Ferguson
    • 6
  1. 1.Pinney Associates and the University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Centers for Behavioral and Preventive MedicineBrown Medical School and the Miriam HospitalProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Cytran Inc.KirklandUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medicine and Center for Tobacco Research and InterventionUniversity of Wisconsin Medical SchoolMadisonUSA
  5. 5.AustinUSA
  6. 6.Department of PharmacologyHoward University College of MedicineWashingtonUSA

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