Effects of glyceollin I on vascular contraction in rat aorta

  • Min-Ji Song
  • Inji Baek
  • Su Bun Jeon
  • Minchul Seo
  • Yong-Hoon Kim
  • Song Cui
  • Yeon-Shin Jeong
  • In-Jung Lee
  • Dong Hyun Shin
  • Young Hyun Hwang
  • In Kyeom Kim
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which glyceollin I inhibits vascular contraction in rat aorta. Rat aortic rings were treated with either glyceollin I or vehicle when vascular contraction reached plateaus. We measured the activity of GTP-RhoA and Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) and the phosphorylation level of the myosin light chain (MLC20), myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1), and PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein for heterotrimeric MLCP of 17 kDa (CPI17). Glyceollin I reduced vascular contraction whether endothelium is present or denuded. Glyceollin I reduced vascular contraction induced by NaF, U46619, phenylephrine, or PDBu. Blockers of K+ channels did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by glyceollin I. Glyceollin I reduced activation of RhoA as well as phosphorylation level of MLC20. Glyceollin I also reduced phosphorylation of MYPT1 and CPI17 induced by NaF but not PDBu. However, glyceollin I had no direct effect on RhoGAP activation in vitro. Glyceollin I reduced vascular contraction, at least in part, through inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway.

Keywords

Glyceollin RhoA Rho-kinase CPI17 MYPT1 Vasorelaxation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the Technology Development Program for Agriculture and Forestry, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Republic of Korea, and the Brain Korea 21 Project in 2009.

Supplementary material

210_2010_513_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (21 kb)
Supplementary Table 1 (PDF 21 kb)
210_2010_513_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (24 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1 (PDF 24 kb)
210_2010_513_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (46 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 2 (PDF 46 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min-Ji Song
    • 1
  • Inji Baek
    • 1
  • Su Bun Jeon
    • 1
  • Minchul Seo
    • 1
  • Yong-Hoon Kim
    • 3
  • Song Cui
    • 3
  • Yeon-Shin Jeong
    • 4
  • In-Jung Lee
    • 4
  • Dong Hyun Shin
    • 4
  • Young Hyun Hwang
    • 4
  • In Kyeom Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyKyungpook National University School of MedicineDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Cardiovascular Research InstituteKyungpook National University School of MedicineDaeguRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.N&B Co., Ltd.Kyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Division of Plant Biosciences, College of Agriculture and Life SciencesKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea

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