Archives of Toxicology

, Volume 86, Issue 9, pp 1369–1378

Rs11892031[A] on chromosome 2q37 in an intronic region of the UGT1A locus is associated with urinary bladder cancer risk

  • Silvia Selinski
  • Marie-Louise Lehmann
  • Meinolf Blaszkewicz
  • Daniel Ovsiannikov
  • Oliver Moormann
  • Christoph Guballa
  • Alexander Kress
  • Michael C. Truß
  • Holger Gerullis
  • Thomas Otto
  • Dimitri Barski
  • Günter Niegisch
  • Peter Albers
  • Sebastian Frees
  • Walburgis Brenner
  • Joachim W. Thüroff
  • Miriam Angeli-Greaves
  • Thilo Seidel
  • Gerhard Roth
  • Frank Volkert
  • Rainer Ebbinghaus
  • Hans M. Prager
  • Hermann M. Bolt
  • Michael Falkenstein
  • Anna Zimmermann
  • Torsten Klein
  • Thomas Reckwitz
  • Hermann C. Roemer
  • Mark Hartel
  • Wobbeke Weistenhöfer
  • Wolfgang Schöps
  • S. Adibul Hassan Rizvi
  • Muhammad Aslam
  • Gergely Bánfi
  • Imre Romics
  • Katja Ickstadt
  • Jan G. Hengstler
  • Klaus Golka
Toxicogenomics

DOI: 10.1007/s00204-012-0854-y

Cite this article as:
Selinski, S., Lehmann, ML., Blaszkewicz, M. et al. Arch Toxicol (2012) 86: 1369. doi:10.1007/s00204-012-0854-y

Abstract

Recently, rs11892031[A] has been identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to confer increased risk of urinary bladder cancer (UBC). To confirm this association and additionally study a possible relevance of exposure to urinary bladder carcinogens, we investigated the IfADo UBC study group, consisting of eight case–control series from different regions including 1,805 cases and 2,141 controls. This analysis was supplemented by a meta-analysis of all published data, including 13,395 cases and 54,876 controls. Rs11892031 A/A was significantly associated with UBC risk in the IfADo case–control series adjusted to cigarette smoking, gender, age and ethnicity (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.02–1.37; P = 0.026). In the meta-analysis, a convincing association with UBC risk was obtained (OR = 1.19; 95% Cl = 1.12–1.26; P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the highest odds ratios were obtained for individual case–control series with a high degree of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic amines: cases with suspected occupational UBC (OR = 1.41) and cases from the highly industrialized Ruhr area (OR = 1.98) compared with Ruhr area controls (all combined OR = 1.46). Odds ratios were lower for study groups with no or a lower degree of occupational exposure to bladder carcinogens, such as the Hungary (OR = 1.02) or the ongoing West German case–control series (OR = 1.06). However, the possible association of rs11892031[A] with exposure to bladder carcinogens still should be interpreted with caution, because in contrast to the differences between the individual study groups, interview-based data on occupational exposure were not significantly associated with rs11892031. In conclusion, the association of rs11892031[A] with UBC risk could be confirmed in independent study groups.

Keywords

Aromatic amines Benzidine Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) rs17863783 Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A 

Supplementary material

204_2012_854_MOESM1_ESM.doc (876 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 876 kb)
204_2012_854_MOESM2_ESM.doc (63 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 63 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Silvia Selinski
    • 1
  • Marie-Louise Lehmann
    • 1
  • Meinolf Blaszkewicz
    • 1
  • Daniel Ovsiannikov
    • 2
  • Oliver Moormann
    • 2
  • Christoph Guballa
    • 3
  • Alexander Kress
    • 3
  • Michael C. Truß
    • 3
  • Holger Gerullis
    • 4
  • Thomas Otto
    • 4
  • Dimitri Barski
    • 5
  • Günter Niegisch
    • 5
  • Peter Albers
    • 5
  • Sebastian Frees
    • 6
  • Walburgis Brenner
    • 6
  • Joachim W. Thüroff
    • 6
  • Miriam Angeli-Greaves
    • 7
  • Thilo Seidel
    • 8
  • Gerhard Roth
    • 8
  • Frank Volkert
    • 8
  • Rainer Ebbinghaus
    • 9
  • Hans M. Prager
    • 9
  • Hermann M. Bolt
    • 1
  • Michael Falkenstein
    • 1
  • Anna Zimmermann
    • 1
  • Torsten Klein
    • 10
  • Thomas Reckwitz
    • 3
  • Hermann C. Roemer
    • 1
    • 11
  • Mark Hartel
    • 12
  • Wobbeke Weistenhöfer
    • 1
    • 13
  • Wolfgang Schöps
    • 14
  • S. Adibul Hassan Rizvi
    • 15
  • Muhammad Aslam
    • 16
  • Gergely Bánfi
    • 17
  • Imre Romics
    • 17
  • Katja Ickstadt
    • 18
  • Jan G. Hengstler
    • 1
  • Klaus Golka
    • 1
  1. 1.Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo)DortmundGermany
  2. 2.Department of UrologySt.-Josefs-HospitalDortmundGermany
  3. 3.Department of UrologyKlinikum Dortmund gGmbHDortmundGermany
  4. 4.Department of UrologyLukasklinik NeussNeussGermany
  5. 5.Department of UrologyHeinrich-Heine UniversityDüsseldorfGermany
  6. 6.Department of UrologyJohannes Gutenberg UniversityMainzGermany
  7. 7.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical SchoolUniversidad Central de VenezuelaCaracasVenezuela
  8. 8.Department of UrologyPaul Gerhardt FoundationLutherstadt WittenbergGermany
  9. 9.Institute for Occupational, Social and Environmental MedicineCastrop-RauxelGermany
  10. 10.Department of Anaesthesia and Critical CareSt. Vincenz HospitalMendenGermany
  11. 11.Institute for General MedicineUniversity Hospital of EssenEssenGermany
  12. 12.Department of SurgeryKlinikum Dortmund gGmbHDortmundGermany
  13. 13.Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine (IPASUM)University of Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany
  14. 14.Practice for UrologySt. AugustinGermany
  15. 15.Sindh Institute of Urology and TransplantationKarachiPakistan
  16. 16.Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity KarachiKarachiPakistan
  17. 17.Department of UrologySemmelweis UniversityBudapestHungary
  18. 18.Faculty of StatisticsTU Dortmund UniversityDortmundGermany

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