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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 175, Issue 3, pp 208–219 | Cite as

Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

  • Jodi Switzer Blum
  • John F. Stolz
  • Aharon Oren
  • Ronald S. Oremland
Original Paper

Abstract.

We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

Halophile Anaerobe Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov. sp. nov. Dead Sea Selenate reduction Nitrate reduction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jodi Switzer Blum
    • 1
  • John F. Stolz
    • 2
  • Aharon Oren
    • 3
  • Ronald S. Oremland
    • 1
  1. 1.US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, ms 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
  2. 2.Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, 15282–6333, USA
  3. 3.The Institute of Life Sciences and The Moshe Shilo Minerva Center for Marine Biogeochemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem, Israel

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