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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 200, Issue 8, pp 1205–1216 | Cite as

Lipopeptide biodiversity in antifungal Bacillus strains isolated from Algeria

  • Lamia Abdellaziz
  • Marlène Chollet
  • Ahmed Abderrahmani
  • Max Béchet
  • Lamia Yaici
  • Gabrielle Chataigné
  • Anthony Arguelles Arias
  • Valérie Leclère
  • Philippe JacquesEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Several Bacillus strains have been well studied for their ability to control soil-borne plant diseases. This property is linked to the production of several families of lipopeptides. Depending of their structure, these compounds show antifungal and/or plant systemic resistance inducing activities. In this work, the biodiversity of lipopeptides produced by different antifungal Bacillus strains isolated from seeds, rhizospheric, and non-rhizospheric soils in Algeria was analyzed. Sixteen active strains were characterized by PCR for their content in genes involved in lipopeptide biosynthesis and by MALDI-ToF for their lipopeptide production, revealing a high biodiversity of products. The difficulty to detect kurstakin genes led us to design two new sets of specific primers. An interesting potential of antifungal activity and the synthesis of two forms of fengycins differing in the eighth amino acid (Gln/Glu) were found from the strain 8. Investigation of its genome led to the finding of an adenylation domain of the fengycin synthetase predicted to activate the glutamate residue instead of the glutamine one. According to the comparison of both the results of MALDI-ToF-MS and genome analysis, it was concluded that this adenylation domain could activate both residues at the same time. This study highlighted that the richness of the Algerian ecosystems in Bacillus strains is able to produce: surfactin, pumilacidin, lichenysin, kurstakin, and different types of fengycins.

Keywords

Lipopeptides Kurstakin Specific primers Fengycin Algerian Bacillus strains 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has been carried out in the framework of Alibiotech project which is financed by European Union, French State, and the French Region of Hauts-de-France and of INTERREG Va SMARTBIOCONTROL portfolio (Bioscreen Project) which is financed by European Union and Walloon Region.

Supplementary material

203_2018_1537_MOESM1_ESM.doc (108 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 108 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lamia Abdellaziz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marlène Chollet
    • 2
  • Ahmed Abderrahmani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Max Béchet
    • 2
  • Lamia Yaici
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gabrielle Chataigné
    • 2
  • Anthony Arguelles Arias
    • 3
  • Valérie Leclère
    • 2
  • Philippe Jacques
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Microbiological Team, Cellular and Molecular Biological Laboratory, Faculty of Biological SciencesUniversity of Sciences and Technology Houari BoumedieneAlgiersAlgeria
  2. 2.Univ. Lille, INRA, ISA, Univ. Artois, Univ. Littoral Côte d’Opale, EA 7394-ICV-Institut Charles ViolletteLilleFrance
  3. 3.Microbial Processes and Interactions, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, TERRA Teaching and Research CentreUniversity of LiegeGemblouxBelgium

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