Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 195, Issue 1, pp 43–49

Streptococcus danieliae sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the caecum of a mouse

Original Paper

Abstract

We report the characterization of one novel bacterium, strain ERD01GT, isolated from the cecum of a TNFdeltaARE mouse. The strain was found to belong to the genus Streptococcus based on phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bacterial species with standing name in nomenclature that was most closely related to our isolate was Streptococcus alactolyticus (97 %). The two bacteria were characterized by a DNA–DNA hybridization similarity value of 35 %, demonstrating that they belong to different species. The new isolate was negative for acetoin production, esculin hydrolysis, urease, α-galactosidase and β-glucosidase, was able to produce acid from starch and trehalose, grew as beta-hemolytic coccobacilli on blood agar, did not grow at >40 °C, did not survive heat treatment at 60 °C for 20 min and showed negative agglutination in Lancefield tests. On the basis of these characteristics, strain ERD01GT differed from the most closely related species S. alactolyticus, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus sanguinis. Thus, based on genotypic and phenotypic evidence, we propose that the isolate belongs to a novel bacterial taxon within the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus danieliae is proposed. The type strain is ERD01GT (= DSM 22233T = CCUG 57647T).

Keywords

TNFdeltaARE mice Crohn’s disease-like ileitis Intestinal microbiota Bacterial culture Streptococcus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biofunctionality Unit, ZIEL—Research Center for Nutrition and Food SciencesTechnische Universität MünchenFreising-WeihenstephanGermany
  2. 2.NovaBiotics LtdAberdeenUK

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