Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 189, Issue 2, pp 175–179 | Cite as

Colonization of broilers by Campylobacter jejuni internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii

  • William J. Snelling
  • Norman J. Stern
  • Colm J. Lowery
  • John E. Moore
  • Emma Gibbons
  • Ciara Baker
  • James S. G. Dooley
Short Communication

Abstract

Although Campylobacter survives within amoeba in-vitro, it is unknown if intra-amoeba Campylobacter jejuni can colonize broilers. Five groups of 28 day-of-hatch chicks were placed into separate isolators. Groups (1) and (2) were challenged with page’s amoeba saline (PAS), and disinfected planktonic C. jejuni NCTC 11168, respectively. Groups (3), (4) and (5) were challenged with a C. jejuni positive control, C. jejuni in PAS, and intra-amoeba C. jejuni, respectively. After 1, 3, 7 and 14 days post challenge, seven birds from each unit were examined for C. jejuni colonization. For the first time we report that intra-amoeba C. jejuni colonized broilers.

Keywords

Campylobacter jejuni Broilers Drinking water Protozoa Epidemiology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

William J. Snelling was supported by an Invest Northern Ireland RTD Networking Grant and The Northern Ireland Centre of Excellence in Functional Genomics, with funding from the European Union (EU) Program for Peace and Reconciliation, under the Technology Support for the Knowledge-Based Economy. We thank Susan Brooks and Latoya Wiggins of the USDA Agricultural Research Service for their technical assistance. We also acknowledge O’Kane Poultry for their support.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Snelling
    • 1
  • Norman J. Stern
    • 2
  • Colm J. Lowery
    • 1
  • John E. Moore
    • 3
  • Emma Gibbons
    • 1
  • Ciara Baker
    • 1
  • James S. G. Dooley
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of UlsterColeraineNorthern Ireland, UK
  2. 2.USDA, Agricultural Research ServicePoultry Microbiological Safety Research UnitAthensUSA
  3. 3.Northern Ireland Public Health Laboratory, Department of BacteriologyBelfast City HospitalBelfastNorthern Ireland, UK

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