Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 188, Issue 1, pp 89–96

A complex role of Amycolatopsis mediterranei GlnR in nitrogen metabolism and related antibiotics production

  • Hao Yu
  • Yufeng Yao
  • Yang Liu
  • Ruishen Jiao
  • Weihong Jiang
  • Guo-Ping Zhao
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00203-007-0228-7

Cite this article as:
Yu, H., Yao, Y., Liu, Y. et al. Arch Microbiol (2007) 188: 89. doi:10.1007/s00203-007-0228-7

Abstract

Amycolatopsis, genus of a rare actinomycete, produces many clinically important antibiotics, such as rifamycin and vancomycin. Although GlnR of Amycolatopsis mediterranei is a direct activator of the glnA gene expression, the production of GlnR does not linearly correlate with the expression of glnA under different nitrogen conditions. Moreover, A. mediterranei GlnR apparently inhibits rifamycin biosynthesis in the absence of nitrate but is indispensable for the nitrate-stimulating effect for its production, which leads to the hyper-production of rifamycin. When glnR of A. mediterranei was introduced into its phylogenetically related organism, Streptomyces coelicolor, we found that GlnR widely participated in the host strain’s secondary metabolism, resemblance to the phenotypes of a unique S. coelicolorglnR mutant, FS2. In contrast, absence or increment in copy number of the native S. coelicolor glnR did not result in a detectable pleiotrophic effect. We thus suggest that GlnR is a global regulator with a dual functional impact upon nitrogen metabolism and related antibiotics production.

Keywords

Amycolatopsis mediterranei GlnR Nitrate stimulating effect 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hao Yu
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yufeng Yao
    • 1
    • 5
  • Yang Liu
    • 1
    • 6
  • Ruishen Jiao
    • 1
  • Weihong Jiang
    • 1
  • Guo-Ping Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, Institute of Plant Physiology and EcologyShanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Department of Microbiology, School of Life ScienceFudan UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Laboratory of Disease and Health GenomicsChinese National Human Genome Center at ShanghaiShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.East LansingUSA
  5. 5.Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, School of MedicineJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.Biomedical Engineering, and Anatomy & Cell BiologyIndiana University – Purdue University IndianapolisIndianaUSA

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