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Osteoporosis International

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 1221–1222 | Cite as

Comments on Feskanich et al.: Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women

  • L. BybergEmail author
  • K. Michaëlsson
Letter
  • 176 Downloads

References

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgical Sciences, OrthopaedicsUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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