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Osteoporosis International

, Volume 28, Issue 7, pp 2129–2136 | Cite as

Bone mineral density among Korean females aged 20–50 years: influence of age at menarche (The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2011)

  • H. K. Chang
  • D.-G. Chang
  • J.-P. MyongEmail author
  • J.-H. Kim
  • S.-J. Lee
  • Y. S. Lee
  • H.-N. Lee
  • K. H. Lee
  • D. C. Park
  • C. J. Kim
  • S. Y. Hur
  • J. S. Park
  • T. C. Park
Original Article

Abstract

Summary

To evaluate a possible correlation between bone mineral density (BMD) and age at menarche, the present study used the BMD dataset of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-V (KNHANES IV-V). Age at menarche had a small but significant association with BMD of the lumbar spine in premenopausal Korean females, aged 20–50 years.

Introduction

To investigate any correlation between bone mineral density (BMD) and age at menarche in Korean females using data from the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV–V; 2008–2011).

Methods

In total, 37,753 individuals participated in health examination surveys between 2008 and 2011. A total of 5032 premenopausal females aged 20–50 years were eligible. Age, height, weight, and age at menarche were assessed.

Results

Results from the univariate linear regression and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that age (per 1 year), height (per 1 cm), weight (per 1 kg), exercise (per 1 day/week), familial osteoporosis history (yes), parity (n = 0 to ≥4), and menarche age distribution were associated with BMD of the total femur, femur neck, and lumbar spine. After stratifying the bone area and adjusting for age, parity, alcohol intake, smoking, exercise, and familial osteoporosis history, no effect was seen for the total femur or femur neck. Age at menarche 16~17 and ≥18 years groups were associated with BMD of the lumbar spine only.

Conclusions

Age at menarche had a small but significant association with BMD of the lumbar spine in premenopausal Korean females, aged 20–50 years. Females with late menarche may achieve lower peak bone mass at some skeletal sites, which may put them at greater risk for osteoporosis in later life.

Keywords

Bone mineral density Menarche Osteoporosis 

Abbreviations

KNHANES

Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

BMD

Bone mineral density

BMI

Body mass index

SEs

Standard errors

ERs

Estrogen receptors

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by Research Fund of Seoul St. Mary’s hospital, The Catholic University of Korea.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. K. Chang
    • 1
  • D.-G. Chang
    • 2
  • J.-P. Myong
    • 3
    Email author
  • J.-H. Kim
    • 2
  • S.-J. Lee
    • 4
  • Y. S. Lee
    • 5
  • H.-N. Lee
    • 6
  • K. H. Lee
    • 7
  • D. C. Park
    • 4
  • C. J. Kim
    • 8
  • S. Y. Hur
    • 7
  • J. S. Park
    • 7
  • T. C. Park
    • 9
  1. 1.Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and HospitalNational Cancer CenterGoyangRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital, College of MedicineInje UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Vincent’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Daejeon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bucheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySeoul St.Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  8. 8.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Paul’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  9. 9.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uijeongbu St. Mary’s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea

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