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Osteoporosis International

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 1081–1088 | Cite as

Exercise habits during middle age are associated with lower prevalence of sarcopenia: the ROAD study

  • T. AkuneEmail author
  • S. Muraki
  • H. Oka
  • S. Tanaka
  • H. Kawaguchi
  • K. Nakamura
  • N. Yoshimura
Original Article

Abstract

Summary

The present cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia and clarified its associated factors in 1,000 elderly participants of Japanese population-based cohorts. Exercise habit in middle age was associated with low prevalence of sarcopenia in older age, suggesting that it is a protective factor against sarcopenia in older age.

Introduction

The present study investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) definition, and clarified the association of sarcopenia with physical performance in the elderly participants of Japanese population-based cohorts of the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study.

Methods

We enrolled 1,000 participants (aged ≥65 years) from the second visit of the ROAD study who had completed assessment of handgrip strength, gait speed, and skeletal muscle mass measured by bioimpedance analysis. Presence of sarcopenia was determined according to the EWGSOP algorithm. Information collected included exercise habits in middle age.

Results

Prevalence of sarcopenia was 13.8 % in men and 12.4 % in women, and tended to be significantly higher according to increasing age in both sexes. Factors associated with sarcopenia, as determined by logistic regression analysis, were chair stand time (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.04–1.14), one-leg standing time (OR, 0.97; 95 % CI, 0.96–0.99), and exercise habit in middle age (OR, 0.53; 95 % CI, 0.31–0.90). Exercise habit in middle age was associated with low prevalence of sarcopenia in older age. Furthermore, linear regression analysis revealed that exercise habits in middle age were significantly associated with grip strength (P < .001), gait speed (P < .001), and one-leg standing time (P = .005) in older age.

Conclusions

This cross-sectional study suggests that exercise habit in middle age is a protective factor against sarcopenia in older age and effective in maintaining muscle strength and physical performance in older age.

Keywords

Elderly Epidemiology Exercise Physical performance Sarcopenia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S19109007, B20390182, B23390172, B23390356, and B23390357) from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology; H17-Men-eki-009, H18-Choujyu-037, H20-Choujyu-009, H21-Chouju-Wakate-011, H22-Chouju-Wakate-007, and H23-Chouju-002 from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare; and Research Aid from the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA-Subsidized Science Project Research 2006–1 and 2010–2).

Conflicts of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Akune
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. Muraki
    • 1
  • H. Oka
    • 2
  • S. Tanaka
    • 3
  • H. Kawaguchi
    • 3
  • K. Nakamura
    • 4
  • N. Yoshimura
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Motor System Medicine, 22nd Century Medical and Research Center, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Joint Disease Research, 22nd Century Medical and Research Center, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with DisabilitiesSaitamaJapan

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