Osteoporosis International

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 133–141

Impact of smoking on bone mineral density and bone metabolism in elderly men: the Fujiwara-kyo Osteoporosis Risk in Men (FORMEN) study

  • J. Tamaki
  • M. Iki
  • Y. Fujita
  • K. Kouda
  • A. Yura
  • E. Kadowaki
  • Y. Sato
  • J. S. Moon
  • K. Tomioka
  • N. Okamoto
  • N. Kurumatani
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-010-1238-x

Cite this article as:
Tamaki, J., Iki, M., Fujita, Y. et al. Osteoporos Int (2011) 22: 133. doi:10.1007/s00198-010-1238-x

Abstract

Summary

Our cross-sectional analysis of 1,576 men aged ≥65 years examined smoking effects on bone status. Number of smoking years was associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD), after adjusting for age, height, weight, and number of cigarettes smoked daily. Smoking did not affect biochemical marker serum values for bone turnover.

Introduction

The impact of smoking on bone status in men has not been conclusively established. We examined how smoking and its cessation influence bone status and metabolism in men.

Methods

We analyzed 1,576 men among a baseline survey of Japanese men aged ≥65 years, the Fujiwara-kyo Osteoporosis Risk in Men study, conducted during 2007–2008.

Results

Lumbar spine (LS) BMD values among never, former, and current smokers were 1.045 ± 0.194, 1.030 ± 0.189, and 1.001 ± 0.182 g/cm2 (P = 0.005), respectively, while total hip (TH) BMD values were 0.888 ± 0.120, 0.885 ± 0.127, and 0.870 ± 0.124 (P = 0.078), respectively. The significant trend for LS BMD remained after adjusting for the covariates; age, height, weight, physical activity, milk consumption, and drinking habit (P = 0.036). Among never and ever (current and former) smokers, LS and TH BMD decreased with the number of pack years or the number of smoking years, respectively, adjusted for those covariates. Among ever smokers, LS and TH BMD decreased with the number of smoking years after adjusting for age, height, weight, and number of cigarettes smoked daily. Smoking did not reveal significant effect for serum osteocalcin or tartrate resistant acid phosphatase isoenzyme 5b.

Conclusion

The impact of smoking on bone status is mainly associated with the number of smoking years in elderly men.

Keywords

Bone metabolism Bone mineral density Men Smoking 

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Tamaki
    • 1
  • M. Iki
    • 1
  • Y. Fujita
    • 1
  • K. Kouda
    • 1
  • A. Yura
    • 1
  • E. Kadowaki
    • 1
  • Y. Sato
    • 2
  • J. S. Moon
    • 3
  • K. Tomioka
    • 4
  • N. Okamoto
    • 4
  • N. Kurumatani
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Public HealthKinki University School of MedicineOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Human LifeJin-ai UniversityEchizenJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Human Sciences, Taisei Gakuin UniversitySakaiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Community Health and EpidemiologyNara Medical University School of MedicineKashiharaJapan

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