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Osteoporosis International

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 1487–1491 | Cite as

The association between osteoporosis and static balance in elderly women

  • D. C. Abreu
  • D. C. Trevisan
  • G. C. Costa
  • F. M. Vasconcelos
  • M. M. Gomes
  • A. A. Carneiro
Original Article

Abstract

Summary

This study aimed at answering the question: do people with high bone loss have greater postural instability? Groups were separated into group 1: women with normal bone mineral density, group 2: women with osteopenia, and group 3: women with osteoporosis. The balance was evaluated in four upright postural situations. Osteoporosis group had greater oscillation in the anteroposterior displacement in all situations compared to control group and the greatest mediolateral displacement in all situations compared to other groups.

Introduction

It is not known whether the presence of osteoporosis can be considered a factor aggravating the postural control. This study aimed at answering the question: do people with high bone loss have greater postural instability?

Methods

This study was divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 20) consisting of women with normal bone mineral density, group 2 (n = 20) women with osteopenia, and group 3 (n = 20) women with osteoporosis. All the participants were submitted to evaluation of the balance using the Polhemus system in four upright postural situations.

Results

Osteoporosis group had greater oscillation in the anteroposterior displacement in all situations compared to control group. The osteoporosis group also showed the greatest mediolateral displacement in all situations compared to other groups.

Conclusion

The results suggest that osteoporotic women had the worst balance, possibly due to the more pronounced body changes compared to non-osteoporotic women.

Keywords

Bone mineral density Elderly women Postural control Static balance 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank FAPESP (#2007/54596-0, #2007/57685-4) and CNPq (PIC 08/09) for the support provided.

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. C. Abreu
    • 1
    • 3
  • D. C. Trevisan
    • 1
  • G. C. Costa
    • 1
  • F. M. Vasconcelos
    • 1
  • M. M. Gomes
    • 1
  • A. A. Carneiro
    • 2
  1. 1.Physiotherapy Course, Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of Locomotor SystemUniversity of São Paulo, School of Medicine, Ribeirão Preto FMRP-USPRibeirão PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Physics and MathematicsFFCLRP-USPRibeirão PretoBrazil
  3. 3.Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho LocomotorFMRP/USPRibeirão PretoBrazil

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