Osteoporosis International

, Volume 21, Issue 8, pp 1323–1330 | Cite as

Hip fractures in Italy: 2000–2005 extension study

  • P. Piscitelli
  • F. Gimigliano
  • S. Gatto
  • A. Marinelli
  • A. Gimigliano
  • P. Marinelli
  • G. Chitano
  • M. Greco
  • L. Di Paola
  • E. Sbenaglia
  • M. Benvenuto
  • M. Muratore
  • E. Quarta
  • F. Calcagnile
  • G. Colì
  • O. Borgia
  • B. Forcina
  • F. Fitto
  • A. Giordano
  • A. Distante
  • M. Rossini
  • A. Angeli
  • A. Migliore
  • G. Guglielmi
  • G. Guida
  • M. L. Brandi
  • R. Gimigliano
  • G. Iolascon
Original Article

Abstract

Summary

A total of 507,671 people ≥65 experienced hip fractures between 2000 and 2005. In 2005, 94,471 people ≥65 were hospitalized due to hip fractures, corresponding to a 28.5% increase over 6 years. Most fractures occurred in patients ≥75 (82.9%; n = 420,890; +16% across 6 years), particularly in women (78.2%; n = 396,967).

Introduction

We aimed to analyze incidence and costs of hip fractures in Italy over the last 6 years.

Methods

We analyzed the national hospitalization and DRG databases concerning fractures occurred in people ≥65 between 2000 and 2005.

Results

A total of 507,671 people ≥65 experienced hip fractures across 6 years, resulting in about 120,000 deaths. In year 2005 94,471 people aged ≥65 were hospitalized due to hip fractures, corresponding to a 28.5% increase over 6 years. The majority of hip fractures occurred in patients ≥75 (82.9%; n = 420,890; +16% across 6 years) and particularly in women (78.2%; n = 396,967). Among women, 84.2% of fractures (n = 334,223; +28.0% over 6 years) were experienced by patients ≥75, which is known to be the age group with the highest prevalence of osteoporosis, accounting for 68.6% of the overall observed increase in the total number of fractures. Hip fractures in men ≥75 increased by 33.1% (up to 16,540). Hospitalization costs increased across the six examined years (+36.1%) reaching 467 million euros in 2005, while rehabilitation costs rose up to 531 million in the same year.

Conclusions

Hip fractures of the elderly are increasing and represent a major health problem in industrialized countries such as Italy.

Keywords

Costs Epidemiology Hip fractures Incidence Osteoporosis Rehabilitation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. L. Lispi and D. Del Gigante (General Direction for Planning Affairs, Italian Ministry of Health) for their help in the analysis of national hospitalization data. Many thanks to the CERSUM research group on osteoporosis (Euro Mediterranean Scientific Biomedical Institute, ISBEM/IFC CNR, Brindisi).

Conflicts of interest

AD, AM, SG, PM, MM, EQ, FC, FF, GC, MLB, GC, AG, GG, RG, GI have received research grant and funding for consulting/speaking by Merck, Sanofi-Aventis, Novartis, Stroder-Servier, Procter & Gamble, Ely Lilly, Roche, Glaxo; PP has received once funding for consulting/speaking by Sanofi-Aventis; FG, AM, GC, MC, LDP, MB, ES, OB, BF: no disclosures.

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Piscitelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Gimigliano
    • 3
  • S. Gatto
    • 3
  • A. Marinelli
    • 3
  • A. Gimigliano
    • 3
  • P. Marinelli
    • 3
  • G. Chitano
    • 2
  • M. Greco
    • 2
  • L. Di Paola
    • 2
  • E. Sbenaglia
    • 2
  • M. Benvenuto
    • 2
  • M. Muratore
    • 4
  • E. Quarta
    • 4
  • F. Calcagnile
    • 4
  • G. Colì
    • 4
  • O. Borgia
    • 4
  • B. Forcina
    • 5
  • F. Fitto
    • 6
  • A. Giordano
    • 7
  • A. Distante
    • 2
    • 8
  • M. Rossini
    • 9
  • A. Angeli
    • 10
  • A. Migliore
    • 11
  • G. Guglielmi
    • 12
  • G. Guida
    • 3
  • M. L. Brandi
    • 1
  • R. Gimigliano
    • 3
  • G. Iolascon
    • 3
  1. 1.University of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.ISBEM Research InstituteMesagneItaly
  3. 3.Second University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  4. 4.Local Health Authority of LecceSan CesarioItaly
  5. 5.Forcina LaboratoriesGalatinaItaly
  6. 6.Città di Lecce HospitalLecceItaly
  7. 7.University of SienaSienaItaly
  8. 8.University of PisaPisaItaly
  9. 9.University of VeronaVeronaItaly
  10. 10.University of TurinTurinItaly
  11. 11.Fatebenefratelli St. Peters’ HospitalRomeItaly
  12. 12.IRCCS “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza”S. Giovanni RotondoItaly

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