Osteoporosis International

, Volume 20, Issue 11, pp 1807–1820

Global vitamin D status and determinants of hypovitaminosis D

  • A. Mithal
  • D. A. Wahl
  • J.-P. Bonjour
  • P. Burckhardt
  • B. Dawson-Hughes
  • J. A. Eisman
  • G. El-Hajj Fuleihan
  • R. G. Josse
  • P. Lips
  • J. Morales-Torres
  • on behalf of the IOF Committee of Scientific Advisors (CSA) Nutrition Working Group
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-009-0954-6

Cite this article as:
Mithal, A., Wahl, D.A., Bonjour, JP. et al. Osteoporos Int (2009) 20: 1807. doi:10.1007/s00198-009-0954-6

Abstract

Summary

This review describes the vitamin D status in different regions of the world with the objective of understanding the scope of hypovitaminosis D and the factors related to its prevalence that may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and fragility fractures.

Introduction

Vitamin D status has been linked to the pathogenesis of hip fractures as well as other skeletal and non-skeletal disorders. The purpose of this review is to provide a global perspective of vitamin D status across different regions of the world and to identify the common and significant determinants of hypovitaminosis D.

Methods

Six regions of the world were reviewed—Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Latin America, North America, and Oceania—through a survey of published literature.

Results

The definition of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as well as assay methodology for 25-hydroxyvitamin D or 25(OH)D, vary between studies. However, serum 25(OH)D levels below 75 nmol/L are prevalent in every region studied whilst levels below 25 nmol/L are most common in regions such as South Asia and the Middle East. Older age, female sex, higher latitude, winter season, darker skin pigmentation, less sunlight exposure, dietary habits, and absence of vitamin D fortification are the main factors that are significantly associated with lower 25(OH)D levels.

Conclusion

Reports from across the world indicate that hypovitaminosis D is widespread and is re-emerging as a major health problem globally.

Keywords

Prevalence Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Vitamin D deficiency 

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Mithal
    • 1
  • D. A. Wahl
    • 2
  • J.-P. Bonjour
    • 4
  • P. Burckhardt
    • 5
  • B. Dawson-Hughes
    • 3
  • J. A. Eisman
    • 6
  • G. El-Hajj Fuleihan
    • 7
  • R. G. Josse
    • 8
  • P. Lips
    • 9
  • J. Morales-Torres
    • 10
  • on behalf of the IOF Committee of Scientific Advisors (CSA) Nutrition Working Group
  1. 1.Indraprastha Apollo HospitalsNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.International Osteoporosis FoundationNyonSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition, Research Center on AgingTufts UniversityBostonUSA
  4. 4.Division of Bone DiseasesGeneva Hospitals and Faculty of MedicineGenevaSwitzerland
  5. 5.Association Suisse contre l’OstéoporoseClinique Bois-CerfLausanneSwitzerland
  6. 6.Garvan Institute of Medical ResearchSt Vincent’s Hospital and University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  7. 7.Department of Internal MedicineAmerican University of Beirut Medical CenterBeirutLebanon
  8. 8.St Michael’s Hospital Health CentreTorontoCanada
  9. 9.Division of Internal Medicine, Endocrine SectionVU University Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  10. 10.Hospital Aranda de la ParraLeónMexico

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