Osteoporosis International

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 217–224 | Cite as

Effectiveness of alendronate and etidronate in the treatment of osteoporosis in men: a prospective observational study

  • W. P. Olszynski
  • K. S. Davison
  • G. Ioannidis
  • J. P. Brown
  • D. A. Hanley
  • R. G. Josse
  • T. M. Murray
  • A. Papaioannou
  • R. J. Sebaldt
  • A. M. Tenenhouse
  • A. Petrie
  • C. H. Goldsmith
  • J. D. Adachi
Original Article

Abstract

The prevalence of osteoporosis in men is higher than previously assumed; consequently, numerous therapies are being investigated to treat these patients. The Canadian Database of Osteoporosis and Osteopenia patients (CANDOO) was analyzed to examine changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in consecutively seen osteoporotic men administered alendronate, etidronate or no bone-active drugs (control) over 1 year. A total of 244 men attending six Canadian osteoporosis clinics were included in the study (42 alendronate, 102 etidronate and 100 control). Multiple imputation was used to model missing data to provide a more robust statistical model. The imputed datasets (five) were analyzed using multivariable linear regression to determine differences between groups in the percent change of lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) BMD from baseline to 1 year. Differences in the percent change in BMD from baseline were most notable at the LS in favor of alendronate (4.3%; 95% CI: 2.1, 6.6 ) and etidronate (2.1%; 95% CI: 0.3, 4.0) therapy when compared with controls. At the LS, alendronate therapy led to significantly greater (2.2%; 95% CI: 0.2, 4.2) gains in BMD as compared to etidronate therapy. Compared to controls, there were no significant differences in FN BMD with alendronate (2.1%; 95% CI: −0.4, 4.7) or etidronate therapy (0.9%; 95% CI: −1.1, 2.8), nor were there significant differences between bisphosphonate groups (1.3%; 95% CI: −1.1, 3.6, in favor of alendronate). While both alendronate and etidronate significantly increased LS BMD in osteoporotic men after 1 year in real-world settings, alendronate therapy resulted in significantly superior gains in LS BMD. The effect of these two bisphosphonates on fractures and FN BMD in osteoporotic men is likely positive, but requires further study.

Keywords

Alendronate Bisphosphonate BMD Etidronate Men Osteoporosis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Procter and Gamble, Canada Inc. (Canada), contributed funds for the development and upkeep of the CANDOO database.

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. P. Olszynski
    • 1
  • K. S. Davison
    • 2
  • G. Ioannidis
    • 3
  • J. P. Brown
    • 2
  • D. A. Hanley
    • 4
  • R. G. Josse
    • 5
  • T. M. Murray
    • 5
  • A. Papaioannou
    • 3
  • R. J. Sebaldt
    • 6
    • 7
  • A. M. Tenenhouse
    • 8
  • A. Petrie
    • 7
  • C. H. Goldsmith
    • 6
  • J. D. Adachi
    • 3
    • 9
  1. 1.Saskatoon Osteoporosis CentreSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Rheumatology and Immunology Research DepartmentCHUL Research Center, Laval UniversitySte-FoyCanada
  3. 3.Department of MedicineMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  4. 4.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of MedicineUniversity of Calgary Health Sciences CenterCalgaryCanada
  5. 5.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of MedicineUniversity of TorontoCanada
  6. 6.Department of Clinical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  7. 7.Clinforma Data Systems and Project ManagementFig.P Software IncorporatedHamiltonCanada
  8. 8.Department MedicineMontreal General Hospital, McGill UniversityCanada
  9. 9.Hamilton Arthritis CentreSt. Joseph’s Healthcare, McMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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