Shock Waves

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 331–336 | Cite as

Contact surface tailoring condition for shock tubes with different driver and driven section diameters

  • Zekai Hong
  • David F. Davidson
  • Ronald K. Hanson
Original Article

Abstract

The contact surface tailoring conditions normally used for shock tubes do not apply to shock tubes with different driver and driven section diameters. A theoretical model is presented that predicts the contact surface tailoring condition for a convergent shock tube, designed to have a larger driver cross-section area than the driven section. The tailoring condition previously developed for shock tubes with uniform driver and driven diameters can be recovered from this model. Representative on- and off-model performance is verified experimentally in a high-pressure convergent shock. Tailoring conditions calculated with the model are also given for commonly used driven gases (Ar, N2 and air) and He–N2 driver mixtures as a function of driver/driven area ratio.

Keywords

Tailoring Convergent shock tube Contact surface 

PACS

47.40.Nm 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zekai Hong
    • 1
  • David F. Davidson
    • 1
  • Ronald K. Hanson
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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