International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 25, Issue 8, pp 1127–1132 | Cite as

Randomized trial of a web-based tool for prolapse: impact on patient understanding and provider counseling

  • Erinn M. Myers
  • Barbara L. Robinson
  • Elizabeth J. Geller
  • Ellen Wells
  • Catherine A. Matthews
  • Jacquia L. Fenderson
  • Andrea K. Crane
  • Mary Jannelli
  • AnnaMarie Connolly
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis

Effective patient/provider communication is important to ensure patient understanding, safety, and satisfaction. Our hypothesis was that interactive patient/provider counseling using a web-based tool (iPad™ application) would have a greater impact on patient satisfaction with understanding prolapse symptoms compared with standard counseling (SC).

Methods

Women with complaints of seeing/sensing a vaginal bulge were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial. Participants completed pre- and postvisit Likert scale questionnaires on satisfaction with prolapse knowledge and related anxiety. After new patient histories and physical examinations, study participants were randomized to SC or SC with iPad™. Ninety participants were required to detect a 30 % difference in satisfaction with prolapse knowledge between the two groups.

Results

Ninety women were randomized to SC (n = 44) or SC with iPad™ (n = 46). At baseline, 47 % of women were satisfied with their understanding of bulge symptoms (50 % SC vs. 43.5 % SC with iPad™, p = 0.5). After counseling, 97 % of women reported increased satisfaction with understanding of bulge symptoms (p < 0.0001), with no difference between groups [42/44 (95.5 %) SC vs. 45/46 (97.8 %) SC with iPad™, p = 0.5]. Baseline anxiety was high: 70 % (65.9 % SC vs. 73.9 % SC with iPad™, p = 0.4). After counseling, anxiety decreased to 30 % (p < 0.0001), with improvement in both groups (31.8 % SC vs. 28.3 % SC with iPad™, p = 0.7). Counseling times were similar between groups (9.5 min., SC vs. 8.9 min., SC with iPad, p = 0.4).

Conclusions

Interactive counseling was associated with increased patient satisfaction with understanding bulge symptoms and decreased anxiety whether a web-based tool was used or not.

Keywords

iPad™ Patient education Patient satisfaction Prolapse 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© The International Urogynecological Association 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erinn M. Myers
    • 1
  • Barbara L. Robinson
    • 1
  • Elizabeth J. Geller
    • 1
  • Ellen Wells
    • 1
  • Catherine A. Matthews
    • 1
  • Jacquia L. Fenderson
    • 1
  • Andrea K. Crane
    • 1
  • Mary Jannelli
    • 1
  • AnnaMarie Connolly
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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