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Displacement of ureteral orifices following anterior colporrhaphy

  • Lena DainEmail author
  • Ron Auslander
  • Arie Lissak
  • Ofer Lavie
  • Yoram Abramov
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis

It is currently unknown whether ureteral orifices maintain their anatomic location after reconstructive pelvic surgeries. We therefore aimed to assess ureteral orifices' location after anterior colporrhaphy.

Methods

Between August and December 2007, patients undergoing anterior colporrhaphy for advanced cystocele in our institution underwent cystoscopy with intravenous dye injection and placement of ureteral catheters before and after the surgery. Each ureteral orifice location was marked on an X–Y coordinate on the posterior bladder wall before and after surgery.

Results

Thirteen women aged 44–80 years were included in the study. Postoperatively, ureteral orifices were noted to migrate 0.65 ± 0.3 cm caudally (closer to the urethrovesical junction) (p = 0.002) and 0.32 ± 0.5 cm laterally (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Anterior colporrhaphy is associated with significant caudal and lateral displacement of both ureteral orifices. These findings are of potential importance for pelvic reconstructive surgeons and may facilitate faster cystoscopic evaluation of ureteral patency postoperatively. They may also have implications on the angle of the preferred optical equipment to be used.

Keywords

Anterior colporrhaphy Cystoscopy Ureteral orifices 

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None.

References

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Copyright information

© The International Urogynecological Association 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lena Dain
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Ron Auslander
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Arie Lissak
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ofer Lavie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yoram Abramov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic surgeryHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyCarmel Medical CenterHaifaIsrael
  3. 3.Rappaport Faculty of MedicineTechnion UniversityHaifaIsrael

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