International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 12, pp 1603–1609 | Cite as

Pelvic support, pelvic symptoms, and patient satisfaction after colpocleisis

  • M. P. FitzGerald
  • H. E. Richter
  • C. S. Bradley
  • W. Ye
  • A. C. Visco
  • G. W. Cundiff
  • H. M. Zyczynski
  • P. Fine
  • A. M. Weber
  • for the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network
Original Article

Abstract

The objective was to study the effect of colpocleisis on pelvic support, symptoms, and quality of life and report-associated morbidity and postoperative satisfaction. Women undergoing colpocleisis for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were recruited at six centers. Baseline measures included physical examination, responses to the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire. Three and 12 months after surgery we repeated baseline measures. Of 152 patients with mean age 79 (±6) years, 132 (87%) completed 1 year follow-up. Three and 12 months after surgery, 90/110 (82%) and 75/103 (73%) patients following up had POP stage ≤1. All pelvic symptom scores and related bother significantly improved at 3 and 12 months, and 125 (95%) patients said they were either ‘very satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with the outcome of their surgery. Colpocleisis was effective in resolving prolapse and pelvic symptoms and was associated with high patient satisfaction.

Keywords

Pelvic organ prolapse Urinary incontinence Pelvic floor disorders Colpocleisis Quality of life Surgical outcomes 

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Copyright information

© The International Urogynecological Association 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. P. FitzGerald
    • 1
  • H. E. Richter
    • 2
  • C. S. Bradley
    • 3
  • W. Ye
    • 4
  • A. C. Visco
    • 5
  • G. W. Cundiff
    • 6
  • H. M. Zyczynski
    • 7
  • P. Fine
    • 8
  • A. M. Weber
    • 9
  • for the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network
    • 9
  1. 1.Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive SurgeryLoyola University Medical CenterMaywoodUSA
  2. 2.University of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.University of IowaIowa CityUSA
  4. 4.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  5. 5.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  6. 6.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  7. 7.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  8. 8.Baylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  9. 9.National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentBethesdaUSA

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