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International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 35–40 | Cite as

The Integral Theory of continence

  • Peter E. P. PetrosEmail author
  • Patrick J. WoodmanEmail author
Controversies in Urogynecology

The Integral Theory of incontinence: Editor’s introduction

Steven Swift

e-mail: swifts@musc.edu

The Integral Theory was originally met with a great deal of skepticism, that is, until the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) was introduced. This remarkably successful technology was born out of the observations from this theory. Following the success of the TVT, skeptics became fewer and fewer and the tenets of the Integral Theory became accepted as truth. However, this has also had a deleterious effect, hampering research into the other aspects of the Integral Theory. As often happens, once something is “understood and verified” it is inviolate and research slows down or stops.

We, researchers into pelvic floor disorders, have failed in our fiduciary responsibility to study and prove or disprove the various observations that have been proposed by the Integral Theory. The two commentaries that follow will hopefully serve to re-invigorate discussion and investigations into the Integral Theory...

Keywords

Pelvic Floor Integral Theory Overactive Bladder Anterior Vaginal Wall Pelvic Floor Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© International Urogynecology Journal 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Perth HospitalPerthAustralia
  2. 2.University of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  3. 3.Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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