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The effect of temperature on the mechanical properties and forming limit diagram of Al 5083 produced by equal channel angular rolling

  • J. Eisaabadi Bozcheloei
  • M. Sedighi
  • R. HashemiEmail author
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Abstract

The primary purpose of this research is investigating the effect of increasing temperature on mechanical properties and formability of Al 5083 produced by equal channel angular rolling (ECAR) process. The present work also aims to study the feasibility of increasing temperature as an approach for solving the ductility problem of ultrafine-grained Al 5083, although some strength of the material might be sacrificed. So, the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the effect of temperature increase on mechanical properties and formability has been done. In this paper, the ECAR process has been performed at three different temperatures (i.e., 25 °C, 200 °C, and 300 °C(. Then, the investigation of mechanical properties such as yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and microhardness after each pass of the ECAR at different temperatures has been performed. The results showed that by applying the ECAR process at a specified temperature, the mechanical and microhardness properties of the samples improved, while elongation to fracture reduced. At ambient temperature, and after the 3rd pass of the ECAR process, yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and microhardness compared with the annealed sample increased by 94%, 19%, and 52%, respectively. Also, the mechanical properties of samples after the ECAR process in a specified pass at different temperatures have been evaluated. The obtained results showed that by increasing temperature, the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and microhardness of the samples decreased, but the elongation to fracture as well as the forming limit diagram (FLD) improved. The results illustrated that by applying the ECAR process at a specified temperature, the level of the FLDs moved downward. Also, the FLDs after the 3rd pass of the ECAR at different temperature have been compared. The results showed that the FLD0 (the major forming limit strain in-plane strain mode) at a temperature of 200 °C and 300 °C compared with the ambient temperature increased by 5% and 20%, respectively.

Keywords

Equal channel angular rolling Forming limit diagram Temperature Mechanical properties 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Eisaabadi Bozcheloei
    • 1
  • M. Sedighi
    • 1
  • R. Hashemi
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringIran University of Science and TechnologyTehranIran

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