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Effects of mechanical property parameters on wrinkling behavior of thin-walled tubes in hydroforming process

  • Xiao-Lei CuiEmail author
  • Xiao-Song Wang
  • S. J. Yuan
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
  • 57 Downloads

Abstract

In tube hydroforming, some controllable wrinkles can be used to improve the formability of tubes, so as to obtain the tubular parts with large expansion ratio and relatively uniform wall thickness. In this paper, finite element analysis and experimental research with 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel tubes are used to investigate the effects of mechanical property parameters on wrinkling behavior of thin-walled tubes for hydroforming application. The numerical simulation results show that the effect of elastic modulus is very small and ignorable, but the initial yield stress and tangent modulus of tubes have an obvious effect on their wrinkling behavior. Tubes with higher initial yield stress and lower tangent modulus tend to possess three axisymmetric wrinkles within the lower internal pressure range. Moreover, it is found that the ratio of initial yield stress to flow stress of the tubes, σs/σf, is a significant factor to their wrinkling behavior. Three axisymmetric wrinkles could be produced on the tubes with higher σs/σf under a lower internal pressure. All of these were verified by the experimental results of 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel tubes, whose wrinkles obtained under wrinkling internal pressure of 1.8 ps and 1.2 ps can be flattened completely in the calibration stage. These research findings are extremely meaningful to get controllable wrinkles for different kinds of tubes.

Keywords

Wrinkling Tube hydroforming Mechanical property parameters Thin-walled tubes Axial feeding Internal pressure 

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Notes

Funding information

This study was financially supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No: 51805357, U1637209). The authors wish to express their gratitude for these funding.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Materials Science and EngineeringTaiyuan University of TechnologyTaiyuanPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of MetalsHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinPeople’s Republic of China

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