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Energy-efficient machining systems: a critical review

  • Tao Peng
  • Xun XuEmail author
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Sustainable machining as a critical part in sustainable manufacturing has been valued by manufacturing enterprises of all sizes. The traditional short-term financial considerations are substituted by longer-term sustainable strategies to ensure the competitiveness, and ultimately, the survival of the company. Energy-efficient machining system, which promotes sustainable machining, is the focus of this paper. The energy-efficient machining system requires a comprehensive understanding as well as optimisation of energy consumption. Literature in this field is carefully reviewed and summarised. Energy consumption models, which are regarded as the core of the energy-efficient machining systems, are grouped into four categories, i.e. theoretical, empirical, discrete event-based, and hybrid models. Then, energy optimisation methodologies and strategies are discussed for energy-efficient process planning and production scheduling. The applications such as tool condition monitoring can employ energy information as useful input. Research inspired by energy-efficient machining studies is briefly introduced. The main elements of an individual energy-efficient machining system are then summarised. Discussions, research suggestions, and future directions are given at the end.

Keywords

CNC machine Energy-efficient machining systems Sustainable machining Energy model Power consumption 

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© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of EngineeringThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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