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The Annals of Regional Science

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 489–502 | Cite as

Industry and location effects on UK plants' innovation propensity

  • Stephen Roper
  • James H. Love
  • Brian Ashcroft
  • Stewart Dunlop

Abstract.

This paper uses UK plant-level survey data to examine the relative importance of industry concentration, technological opportunity and locational factors in determining innovation propensity.

 The results suggest no evidence that industry concentration has any significant positive effect on innovation. Industries' technological characteristics are important, however, with the potential for industry-specific spill-over effects. Plants' own technological activities in terms of undertaking R&D and having an R&D department were also important determinants of innovation propensity as were plants' participation in technology transfer and inter-firm networks. Strong locational effects were identified relating to industrial composition, the level of R&D activity, external ownership, the preponderance of small firms and the general level of regional prosperity. In addition, strong interactions were evident between plants' R&D activity and their regional environment. Undertaking R&D enabled plants to take advantage of any environmental benefits for innovation and insulated them from potential negative effects.

Keywords

Technology Transfer Location Effect Regional Environment Small Firm Locational Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Roper
    • 1
  • James H. Love
    • 2
  • Brian Ashcroft
    • 3
  • Stewart Dunlop
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Management and Economics, Northern Ireland Economic Research Centre, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN, UK (e-mail: s.roper@qub.ac.uk)GB
  2. 2.Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK (e-mail: Lovejh@aston.ac.uk)GB
  3. 3.Fraser of Allander Institute, University of Strathclyde, Curran Building, 100 Cathedral Street, Glasgow, G4 0LN, UK (e-mail: b.k.ashcroft@strath.ac.uk)GB

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