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Increased lateral meniscal slope is associated with greater incidence of lateral bone contusions in noncontact ACL injury

  • Ke Li
  • Jia Li
  • Xiaoqing Zheng
  • Vincent Marot
  • Jérôme Murgier
  • Etienne Cavaignac
  • Wei HuangEmail author
KNEE
  • 47 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

(1) To investigate whether an increased lateral meniscal slope measured on magnetic resonance image (MRI) would be associated with greater risk of bone contusions in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury, and (2) to measure the relationship between the occurrence of bone contusions and associated findings observed in ACL deficient knees such as cartilage damage, anterolateral complex injury and concomitant meniscal tears.

Method

Patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery between 2013 and 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-three patients were included in the study group (ACL + bone contusions group), 56 participants were in the control group (isolated ACL group). The presence and severity of bone contusions were determined from preoperative MRIs. The lateral meniscal slope and lateral posterior tibial slope were measured on the MRIs in a blinded fashion. The predictors of lateral bone contusions including age, sex, body mass index, lateral meniscal slope and lateral posterior tibial slope were examined by multivariable logistic regression. Associated findings including concomitant meniscal lesions, intra-articular cartilage damage and anterolateral complex injury, which were also calculated by multivariable logistic regression.

Results

The mean lateral meniscal slope in the study group was 6.5° ± 3.5°, which was significantly larger than that in the control group (3.8° ± 2.7°; P < 0.01). In addition, increased lateral meniscal slope was significantly associated with lateral bone contusions in noncontact ACL injury (Lateral femoral condyle (LFC): AOR 16.5; 95% CI 5.40–50.20; P < 0.01; Lateral tibial plateau (LTP): AOR 31.8; 95% CI 8.68–116.7; P < 0.01). However, lateral posterior tibial slope was not significantly associated with bone contusions. Moreover, the presence of lateral bone contusions was associated with concomitant lateral meniscal tears (OR 12.4; 95% CI 3.30–46.30) and cartilage damage (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.04–8.18).

Conclusion

An increased lateral meniscal slope was associated with increased risk of lateral bone contusions in noncontact ACL injury. In addition, the presence of lateral bone contusions was associated with intra-articular cartilage damage, anterolateral complex injury and concomitant meniscal tears. Hence, additional information was provided for counseling patients who have increased LMS on the greater risk of knee rotational instability and identify patients undergoing ACL reconstruction who may benefit from extra-articular tenodesis.

Level of evidence

IV.

Keywords

ACL injury Bone contusions Lateral meniscal slope Anterolateral ligament 

Notes

Funding

This work is funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.81902293) (K.L).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Ethical approval

This study was approved by the institutional review board of the First Ailiated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (IRB approval number: 2017-108).

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Copyright information

© European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery, Arthroscopy (ESSKA) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ke Li
    • 1
  • Jia Li
    • 3
  • Xiaoqing Zheng
    • 4
  • Vincent Marot
    • 2
  • Jérôme Murgier
    • 5
  • Etienne Cavaignac
    • 2
  • Wei Huang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryThe First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.Department of Orthopedic Surgery and TraumaHôpital Pierre-Paul RiquetToulouseFrance
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  4. 4.Department of PathologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  5. 5.OrthoSport Victoria Research UnitEpworth HealthcareMelbourneAustralia

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