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AI & SOCIETY

pp 1–11 | Cite as

Transitions in human–computer interaction: from data embodiment to experience capitalism

  • Tony D. Sampson
Original Article

Abstract

This article develops a critical theory of human–computer interaction (critical HCI) intended to test some of the assumptions and omissions made in the field as it transitions from a cognitive theoretical frame to a phenomenological understanding of user experience described by Harrison et al. (the three paradigms of HCI. Paper presented at the Conference on human factors in computing systems. https://people.cs.vt.edu/~srh/Downloads/TheThreeParadigmsofHCI.pdf, 2007) as a third research paradigm and similarly Bødker (when second wave HCI meets third-wave challenges. In: NordiCHI ‘06 Proceedings of the 4th Nordic conference on human–computer interaction: changing roles, 1–8. http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1182476; 2006, Interactions 22(5):24–31; Bødker, Interactions 22(5)):24–31, 2015) as third-wave HCI. Although this particular focus on experience has provided some novel avenues of academic enquiry, this article draws attention to a distinct bridge between the conventional HCI disciplinary concerns with predominantly task-based digital work and use context and a growing business interest in consumer experiences in digital environments. Critical HCI addresses the problem of experience in two interrelated ways. On one hand, it explores the role market logic plays in putting user experiences to work. On the other hand, it engages with ontological understandings of experience hitherto realized in HCI by way of a phenomenological matrix (Harrison et al. The three paradigms of HCI. Paper presented at the Conference on human factors in computing systems. https://people.cs.vt.edu/~srh/Downloads/TheThreeParadigmsofHCI.pdf, 2007). The article concludes by bringing in an old thinker (A. N. Whitehead) to consider experience in novel ways that relate ontological concerns to a broader political concept of experience capitalism.

Keywords

Experience Critical HCI Whitehead Capitalism Phenomenology Use context 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Thank you to the organisers of the Streams of Consciousness conference at Warwick University in 2016.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Digital Culture and Communications, College of Arts, Technology and InnovationUniversity of East London, University WayLondonUK

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